UMBC’s Reem Hannun to co-lead urban air quality study with NOAA Climate Award

Emissions from household products are on the rise compared to emissions from combustion engines, but their effect on air quality is poorly understood. “So, if we want to have a better understanding of air quality, now and as climate continues to change, we really need to be able to understand how the chemistry changes with this new class of emissions,” says Reem Hannun. “It’s a new, interesting dynamic.” Continue reading UMBC’s Reem Hannun to co-lead urban air quality study with NOAA Climate Award

UMBC’s Yonathan Zohar to lead $10 million partnership to scale land-based salmon aquaculture

“The mission is to enable an innovative, effective, and sustainable U.S. Atlantic salmon production platform that will transform the U.S. food and aquaculture systems and secure and increase high-quality and affordable seafood production for the world,” Yonathan Zohar says. Continue reading UMBC’s Yonathan Zohar to lead $10 million partnership to scale land-based salmon aquaculture

UMBC to lead climate-focused NSF data science institute through $13M award

Tens of millions of people live in areas that are at risk for flooding due to climate change, sea level rise, and melting of glaciers. UMBC’s Maryam Rahnemoonfar and a team of researchers are using data science, machine learning, and AI to analyze enormous volumes of climate data, and Arctic and Antarctic observations, in ways that could help populations prepare for and respond to these risks.  Continue reading UMBC to lead climate-focused NSF data science institute through $13M award

UMBC to receive $10 million from NASA to support sun and space environment research

The new funding will “enable closer connections between NASA and universities, which simplifies sharing ideas and performing joint research and technology development,” Jan Merka says. He emphasizes, “Another significant benefit is connecting students with research opportunities and mentors in heliophysics.” Continue reading UMBC to receive $10 million from NASA to support sun and space environment research

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UMBC’s Mercedes Burns to explore spider glues and silks with new $900K NSF grant

Spider silks and glues are incredibly difficult to produce synthetically, but could have important medical or industrial applications. Mercedes Burns and Sarah Stellwagen will study sticky substances produced by other animals, which are “sticky like spider silk glues, but maybe their genetic architecture is easier for us to duplicate,” Burns says. Continue reading UMBC’s Mercedes Burns to explore spider glues and silks with new $900K NSF grant

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Hurricanes, well-being, and AI: START Awards set up UMBC researchers for success

Physicist Steve Guimond and collaborators have received a new $682,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to develop, run, and analyze complex hurricane models on supercomputers. However, Guimond might never have received the grant if he hadn’t received a UMBC Strategic Award for Research Transitions (START) first. A new cohort of START funding recipients begins their projects this summer. Continue reading Hurricanes, well-being, and AI: START Awards set up UMBC researchers for success

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UMBC launches Faculty Expert Search tool to connect scholars with the public and each other

Every day UMBC faculty are hard at work testing antivirals in the lab, untangling the impacts of healthcare policy, and processing satellite data on Earth’s atmosphere. They are developing best practices for K-12 teaching, remediating water contaminants, and exploring how actors express intimacy on stage. But how can journalists, students, or the general public learn who these faculty are and what they study? And how can faculty connect with each other for innovative research collaborations? Anyone seeking UMBC experts can now find them through a new online tool that makes searches fast and easy. Continue reading UMBC launches Faculty Expert Search tool to connect scholars with the public and each other

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UMBC and Georgia State receive $3M NIMH grant to improve data-driven diagnosis of mood disorders

UMBC and Georgia State University have received a $3 million five-year grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) for research supporting the diagnosis of mood disorders. Tulay Adali, professor of computer science and electrical engineering and distinguished university professor, will lead UMBC’s portion of the research. She says, “We hope this will enable us to better define subtypes of mental disorders, and will help inform effective and personalized forms of therapy.” Continue reading UMBC and Georgia State receive $3M NIMH grant to improve data-driven diagnosis of mood disorders

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UMBC’s Krizmanic, Cannady contribute to research that adds new wrinkle to understanding the origins of matter in the Milky Way

New research shows that certain elements arrive at Earth from distant parts of the galaxy in different ways. Learning more about how these elements move through the galaxy helps address a fundamental, lingering question in astrophysics: How is matter generated and distributed across the universe? Continue reading UMBC’s Krizmanic, Cannady contribute to research that adds new wrinkle to understanding the origins of matter in the Milky Way

UMBC to partner with UMD, Army Research Lab to advance AI and autonomy through $68M collaboration

UMBC will partner with the University of Maryland, College Park, and the DEVCOM Army Research Lab on the $68-million, five-year endeavor, which ARL is funding. The goal is to strengthen Army AI technology so it is able to meet the demands of today’s national defense. Continue reading UMBC to partner with UMD, Army Research Lab to advance AI and autonomy through $68M collaboration

UMBC to receive over $63 million in NASA renewal of CRESST II space science consortium

NASA has committed $178 million to extend support for the Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science & Technology II (CRESST II), a five-institution research consortium, through 2027. The consortium leverages resources at each institution to develop a diverse talent pipeline in space science and answer big questions about the universe. Continue reading UMBC to receive over $63 million in NASA renewal of CRESST II space science consortium

UMBC’s 2021 grads advance research with public impact—from disaster response to assistive tech

Students from across all three UMBC colleges are graduating this week having taken advantage of the unique undergraduate research opportunities and supportive mentorship UMBC offers. They’re poised to take their research to the next level and move on to new challenges through graduate school and careers. Continue reading UMBC’s 2021 grads advance research with public impact—from disaster response to assistive tech

UMBC’s Ryan Kramer confirms human-caused climate change with direct evidence for first time

Sixteen years of continuous data from NASA’s CERES mission confirm that humans’ role in climate change, indicated by a quantity known as the “radiative forcing,” is the driving factor pulling Earth’s energy budget out of balance. “As far as we can see, the long-term trend in the CERES record seems to be almost entirely accounted for by the radiative forcing,” Ryan Kramer says. Continue reading UMBC’s Ryan Kramer confirms human-caused climate change with direct evidence for first time

Meet “The Terminator”: UMBC-led research connects solar cycle with climate predictions in a new way

Understanding “the terminator” phenomenon may facilitate prediction of weather patterns such as La Niña and El Niño, which affect everything from the likelihood of severe hurricanes to the success of the growing season, several years in advance. The name was an easy choice, lead scientist Robert Leamon says. “It indicates the death of a solar cycle, and, because it’s predictable, it will, as always, ‘be back.’” Continue reading Meet “The Terminator”: UMBC-led research connects solar cycle with climate predictions in a new way

UMBC researchers work to advance neurotechnology through emerging consortium

To tackle questions about how the brain signals body movements, Ramana Vinjamuri, CSEE, is gathering a team of UMBC researchers and corporate and government partners. He received an Industry University Cooperative Research Center planning grant from NSF in 2020, and he sees UMBC as perfectly situated to move this kind of high-impact research collaboration forward. Continue reading UMBC researchers work to advance neurotechnology through emerging consortium

New UMBC-UMB collaborations include research to reduce stress among long-term care workers

The Accelerated Translational Incubator Pilot (ATIP) Program has selected four new interdisciplinary projects by UMBC and UMB researcher partners, each a fresh take on a complex challenge. One will examine how to predict and manage stress in healthcare workers who work in long-term care facilities. Continue reading New UMBC-UMB collaborations include research to reduce stress among long-term care workers

UMBC student research offers hope for critically endangered Bahama Oriole

On a low-lying island in the Caribbean, the future of the critically endangered Bahama Oriole just got a shade brighter. A new study co-led by Michael Rowley estimates that there are at least 10 times as many Bahama Orioles as scientists previously thought. Rowley’s results are the latest in a string of important discoveries led by undergraduates mentored by Kevin Omland. Continue reading UMBC student research offers hope for critically endangered Bahama Oriole

Low-cost infant incubator developed at UMBC completes successful clinical trial in India

A standard incubator found in a newborn ICU costs between $1,500 and $35,000—beyond the means of many hospitals in low- and middle-income countries. This new UMBC-designed incubator costs only $200 and has performed on par with a standard incubator in its first clinical trial. Continue reading Low-cost infant incubator developed at UMBC completes successful clinical trial in India

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UMBC faculty, alumni entrepreneurs receive record number of MIPS awards for tech collaborations

Six UMBC faculty members have just received grants from the Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) program to develop new technologies with potential to grow the state’s economy. This is UMBC’s largest number of winning proposals within a single proposal round since MIPS began. Continue reading UMBC faculty, alumni entrepreneurs receive record number of MIPS awards for tech collaborations

UMBC researchers use AI to help businesses understand complex legal docs, like the Code of Federal Regulations

Businesses that work with the federal government must comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, a binding legal document. Its length and complexity cause challenges for many, so this automation process provides a way to improve understanding and accessibility, explains UMBC’s Karuna Joshi. Continue reading UMBC researchers use AI to help businesses understand complex legal docs, like the Code of Federal Regulations

Quantum computing, but even faster? UMBC researchers explore the possibilities with new NSF grant

Quantum computers have the potential to revolutionize communications, cybersecurity, and more. But as Sebastian Deffner notes, “Even quantum computing has shortcomings.” Deffner and Nathan Myers will explore ways to work around some of quantum computing’s limits with a new NSF grant. And in the process, they just might redefine the fundamental laws of physics. Continue reading Quantum computing, but even faster? UMBC researchers explore the possibilities with new NSF grant

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UMBC’s Danyelle Ireland is named a national Rising Star as champion for transfer students

This award honors Ireland’s years mentoring and advocating for UMBC transfer students in information technology and engineering fields. It also brings greater visibility to UMBC’s transfer student population and to how the university can most effectively support their success. Continue reading UMBC’s Danyelle Ireland is named a national Rising Star as champion for transfer students

Yonathan Zohar by a large fish tank

BARD Fund honors UMBC’s Yonathan Zohar for aquaculture research with $12B global economic impact

Yonathan Zohar has stayed in Baltimore for 30 years because the environment is conducive to research that has a positive societal impact. His early work enabled the growth of the aquaculture industry, and today he continues to develop ground-breaking sustainable, land-based aquaculture processes. Continue reading BARD Fund honors UMBC’s Yonathan Zohar for aquaculture research with $12B global economic impact

satellite image of clouds along a coastline

NASA awards UMBC team $1.4M to develop AI that improves how computers process climate data from satellites

“Now we have so much raw data. So how do we analyze it? How do we make it useful for the research community?” asks Jianwu Wang. As data archives balloon, the capabilities of artificial intelligence are rapidly increasing. There is also an urgent need to understand Earth’s systems as they shift due to climate change. All of these factors drove Wang and his collaborators to find ways to help researchers access satellite data much faster. Continue reading NASA awards UMBC team $1.4M to develop AI that improves how computers process climate data from satellites

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UMBC’s Tara LeGates is first runner-up for prestigious international neurobiology prize

“I’m really interested in how the brain integrates a lot of different kinds of information to regulate complex behaviors, such as seeking rewards,” LeGates says. Her findings published in Nature, and her lab’s continuing work, pave the way for new treatments for disorders such as addiction and depression. Continue reading UMBC’s Tara LeGates is first runner-up for prestigious international neurobiology prize

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UMBC’s Daniel Lobo receives $1.9 million NIH grant to explore genetic control of development and regeneration

Salamanders regenerate their tails. Sea stars regenerate their arms. Most species of planaria, a type of flatworm, can regenerate everything from their brains to their digestive organs. But if you lose part of a finger in a shop class accident, or while chopping vegetables for dinner, you’re out of luck—for now. “Why can the worm do it, and we cannot?” asks Daniel Lobo, assistant professor of biological sciences. That’s not really the question, though, he explains. Continue reading UMBC’s Daniel Lobo receives $1.9 million NIH grant to explore genetic control of development and regeneration

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UMBC’s Elizabeth Patton dives into history of remote work with “Easy Living: The Rise of the Home Office”

Elizabeth Patton’s new book explores how Americans think about the modern home office and why. Due to COVID-19, remote work has hit unprecedented highs, but Patton’s scholarship reveals that it’s far from a new idea. Continue reading UMBC’s Elizabeth Patton dives into history of remote work with “Easy Living: The Rise of the Home Office”

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Bedrock to treetops: NSF awards $4.8M to urban environment study led by UMBC’s Claire Welty

UMBC is leading an eight-institution effort to improve our understanding of Earth’s critical zone (from bedrock to treetops) in urban contexts. Most critical zone research happens in more pristine wilderness areas, because the added effects of urban processes make the research more complicated. But, Welty says, “that’s the most interesting part.” Continue reading Bedrock to treetops: NSF awards $4.8M to urban environment study led by UMBC’s Claire Welty

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UMBC’s first virtual conference on inclusive language engages hundreds of education professionals from around the world

“To acknowledge that Black lives matter, that abuse of power must be stopped is paramount,” shared DàVida Plummer, keynote speaker at UMBC’s Inclusive Language Conference. “And for journalists the world over, we must capture this reality, tell our stories, and maintain objectivity.” Continue reading UMBC’s first virtual conference on inclusive language engages hundreds of education professionals from around the world

UMBC study reveals gender bias in bird song research and impact of women on science

“I believe this paper is a great example of how diversity expands the type of research scientists are doing,” says Casey Haines ’19. “A diverse pool of researchers may result in new questions being asked and new approaches to answering those questions. I would love to see this type of research applied in other areas of STEM.” Continue reading UMBC study reveals gender bias in bird song research and impact of women on science

UMBC-led team receives Dept. of Energy grant to advance nuclear fusion energy research

“While there will be important materials and engineering questions that will need to be addressed before scaling up to a commercial reactor, we will address the most important physics questions that could put us in a path to a demo reactor in years, not decades. We are very excited to be working on a truly transformational technology that will enable a virtually inexhaustible energy source with very small impact to our planet,” says Romero-Talamas. Continue reading UMBC-led team receives Dept. of Energy grant to advance nuclear fusion energy research

Mantis shrimp eyes get even wilder: UMBC team finds twice the expected number of light-detecting proteins

“One of the reasons I love science is that we took this animal with an exceptional visual system, and it’s become even more complex,” Megan Porter says. “Every level that we look at adds another layer of complexity to how the visual system is working.” Continue reading Mantis shrimp eyes get even wilder: UMBC team finds twice the expected number of light-detecting proteins

Campus building near pond

UMBC mathematician Kathleen Hoffman receives new grants to improve HIV modeling

The improved models of disease spread Kathleen Hoffman and colleagues are working toward will help governments and non-profits get “the biggest bang for [their] buck in terms of resource allocation,” Kathleen Hoffman says. Where these groups should focus their time, energy, and money is “the kind of question this kind of work can usually answer.” Continue reading UMBC mathematician Kathleen Hoffman receives new grants to improve HIV modeling