UMBC’s newest Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity explore who has a voice in literature, policy, and social movements

“UMBC is giving me the ultimate opportunity of time and support to think, write, and teach about what matters to me the most—conducting research about my community,” says Fernando Tormos-Aponte, political science. He shares the same enthusiasm that Emily Perez, English, and Blake Francis, philosophy, have about their new appointments as 2019-2020 Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity. Continue reading UMBC’s newest Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity explore who has a voice in literature, policy, and social movements

UMBC spotlights the power of collaboration and community in opening of new science building, GRIT-X talks

“Already there are research teams working in this building on such complex issues as age-related disease, environmental degradation, and health disparities,” says Dean Bill LaCourse. Solutions to our most complex challenges “are found through a convergence of talent and effort,” bringing together the perspectives of people from different fields and backgrounds. This is what the new building is designed to achieve. Continue reading UMBC spotlights the power of collaboration and community in opening of new science building, GRIT-X talks

Six Baltimore City Schools in UMBC Math Project partnership see math test score gains

Maryland PARCC test results, released last week, reveal that Baltimore City schools partnering with UMBC have seen dramatic growth in student math performance. The Baltimore Sun has called this trend one of the “bright spots” at a challenging moment, when many schools across the state are struggling to move the needle on student learning in math. Continue reading Six Baltimore City Schools in UMBC Math Project partnership see math test score gains

Open spaces nurture open minds in UMBC’s new Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building

“When you share a kitchenette with a biologist, a chemist, an engineer and somebody from public policy, it’s inevitable that new things will brew,” says Greg Szeto, who is moving in to the ILSB with the new Translational Center for Age-Related Disease and Disparities. The ILSB “is a total game-changer for me,” adds Chris Hawn. With its state-of-the-art instrumentation, “There are protocols where I can get ‘level unlocked.’ It just opens things up for me and my students.” Continue reading Open spaces nurture open minds in UMBC’s new Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building

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Leaders in public service, music, and addiction research to address UMBC’s Class of 2019

At UMBC’s upcoming commencement ceremonies, students and their families and supporters will hear from three distinguished speakers recognized as leaders in their different fields. They include a UMBC alumnus recently elected county executive, the first woman conductor of a major American orchestra, and one of the world’s top addiction researchers. Continue reading Leaders in public service, music, and addiction research to address UMBC’s Class of 2019

UMBC School of Public Policy and APPAM work to diversify the field through outreach to students

“UMBC was uniquely positioned to meet APPAM’s goals in helping to diversify the field because of UMBC’s strong, diverse student scholars, many of whom are first-generation or come from underrepresented groups,” shares Jane Lincove, associate professor of public policy. Continue reading UMBC School of Public Policy and APPAM work to diversify the field through outreach to students

UMBC ranks among top 150 U.S. universities in federal research funding

The National Science Foundation (NSF) recently released its latest Higher Education Research and Development (HERD) survey, including UMBC among the top 150 U.S. universities in federal research and development expenditures for fiscal year 2017. Continue reading UMBC ranks among top 150 U.S. universities in federal research funding

Victoria Herr, right, talking with CWIT's Cindy Greenwood during a stress buster event during finals.

From visual effects to cybersecurity, UMBC grads share transformative career connections

Each year, thousands of UMBC students complete high-value internships, service-learning, research, and other applied learning experiences, and they have an impact. Surveys of UMBC graduates show that 90 percent head directly to a job, advanced degree, or both. Of those employed, a majority worked for or interned with their employer as a UMBC student. Continue reading From visual effects to cybersecurity, UMBC grads share transformative career connections

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CS3 leads research summit on community-based violence prevention in Baltimore

“We wanted to purposefully use this summit to convene as many researchers as possible to examine, discuss, and share expertise and data,” Mallinson says. “Our intent is increasing collaboration and resources beyond this room, between institutions and the community, to create tangible, applicable and responsive human- and community-centered research in violence prevention with and for Baltimore.” Continue reading CS3 leads research summit on community-based violence prevention in Baltimore

Bahama Oriole Project team awarded NSF grant to offer more UMBC undergrads international research experiences

“Being on the Bahama Oriole Project was my first hands-on glimpse at international research,” Matthew Kane ’19 says. “It was the first time I had seen scientists from two different countries collaborating on a conservation project on this scale.” Continue reading Bahama Oriole Project team awarded NSF grant to offer more UMBC undergrads international research experiences

UMBC education policy expert Jane Arnold Lincove helps launch national center for research on school choice

“Researching school choice is challenging because there are so many stakeholders that are for and against it. But in the end,” she says, “looking at research across the United States allows us to identify what is working and help inform policy to help schools systems create equitable, successful, and safe learning environments.” Continue reading UMBC education policy expert Jane Arnold Lincove helps launch national center for research on school choice

UMBC celebrates alumni in public service at special Annapolis event

“Having UMBC alumni in the Senate, House of Delegates, the Governor’s Office, state agencies, advocacy groups and nonprofits is a great asset,” says House of Delegates Speaker Pro Tem Adrienne A. Jones ’76, psychology. “As public service professionals, we share the same camaraderie and ‘True Grit’ as we did as UMBC students.” Continue reading UMBC celebrates alumni in public service at special Annapolis event

2017 Alumni Awards celebrate impressive contributions across disciplines from UMBC alumni and faculty

“You see this great cadre of people who represent the best of our university, the best of our country and the best of humankind. They are solving the problems of humankind,” said President Hrabowski. “This is by far the best of UMBC.” Continue reading 2017 Alumni Awards celebrate impressive contributions across disciplines from UMBC alumni and faculty

UMBC faculty offer context and analysis on major policy issues, from self-government in D.C. to healthcare

UMBC professors share their research-based reflections on current events in popular media. Recently, humanities and social sciences faculty Derek Musgrove, Christy Ford Chapin, and John Rennie Short have weighed in on topics from Washington D.C.’s long struggle over self-government, to the feasibility of Bernie Sanders’ “Medicare for all” proposal, to decisions over where to host the Olympic Games. Continue reading UMBC faculty offer context and analysis on major policy issues, from self-government in D.C. to healthcare

UMBC’s Chris Curran receives major NIJ grant for research on law enforcement in K–12 schools

“Right now there are students being short-changed by the education system. They are not sitting in a classroom with a high enough quality teacher. They are not being provided the resources they deserve,” Curran reflects. “Too often these disparities run along racial lines, socioeconomic lines, or gender lines, and that is a problem.” Continue reading UMBC’s Chris Curran receives major NIJ grant for research on law enforcement in K–12 schools

Susan Sterett and Anne Brodsky begin new social science leadership roles at UMBC

“Universities can broaden our horizons and invite us to bring our inquiry to our communities,” says Susan Sterett, the new director of the School of Public Policy, emphasizing, “UMBC’s proud tradition of excellence and public service are evident in the problems faculty and students in the School of Public Policy study, and the connection to communities that they bring.” Continue reading Susan Sterett and Anne Brodsky begin new social science leadership roles at UMBC

UMBC alumnus Jerome Adams nominated for U.S. surgeon general, to replace alumna serving as acting S.G.

“He has his hands on the pulse of what’s going on in communities,” a former colleague says of Jerome Adams. “He gets right out there at the grass roots level and really identifies with the folks he needs to serve.” Continue reading UMBC alumnus Jerome Adams nominated for U.S. surgeon general, to replace alumna serving as acting S.G.

UMBC researchers address diverse factors impacting U.S. schooling

UMBC researchers from across the humanities and social sciences recently earned press coverage for their work exploring factors that shape K–12 education in the United States. From inclusive language in classrooms to math pedagogy, each offers insights to spur change and further research to improve children’s educational experiences. Continue reading UMBC researchers address diverse factors impacting U.S. schooling

UMBC forum highlights need for interdisciplinary collaboration in aging research

“Health, we know, is not cardiovascular, is not neurological, is not pathological. Those are completely artificial distinctions,” shared keynote speaker Luigi Ferrucci, director of science at the National Institute on Aging. “It’s become very, very clear that everything interconnects.” Continue reading UMBC forum highlights need for interdisciplinary collaboration in aging research

Roy Meyers publishes primer on the federal budget process, outlining anticipated hurdles for Trump administration proposal

“The bottom line is that the White House publicized a target of $54 billion…in cuts without receiving any feedback from agencies about the feasibility of making them,” writes Meyers, professor of political science. Continue reading Roy Meyers publishes primer on the federal budget process, outlining anticipated hurdles for Trump administration proposal

Baltimore City elementary school students learn about college opportunities through UMBC visit

“Bringing fifth graders to campus gives them the opportunity to see themselves at college, and inspires them to see their own education as interesting and meaningful,” said Jaelyn Bos ’17, biological sciences and environmental science. Continue reading Baltimore City elementary school students learn about college opportunities through UMBC visit

New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

“Science achievement gaps begin early. It is important that our policies and interventions take steps in those early years to ensure increased science achievement for all,” writes F. Chris Curran, an assistant professor of public policy. Continue reading New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

During Rio games, John Rennie Short argues underestimated costs pose major challenges for Olympic host cities

In the article, “On rocky road to Rio, the biggest loser may be the glory of hosting Olympics,” Short comments on the increasing scale of the games, growing global coverage, and underlying structural problems. Continue reading During Rio games, John Rennie Short argues underestimated costs pose major challenges for Olympic host cities

Zero tolerance laws contribute to racial disparities in U.S. public schools, research by F. Chris Curran reveals

“Clearly, such zero tolerance laws were meant to improve the safety and order of the school environment,” writes F. Chris Curran in a new article in The Conversation. “However, in recent years, they have been seen as being overly prescriptive and as contributing to racial disparities in school discipline.” Continue reading Zero tolerance laws contribute to racial disparities in U.S. public schools, research by F. Chris Curran reveals

John Rennie Short

John Rennie Short argues that the South China Sea dispute could have significant global consequences

An international court ruling could escalate geopolitical tensions around the world. That’s according to School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short, who explains in a new op-ed how an ongoing dispute in the South China Sea could have significant global consequences. Continue reading John Rennie Short argues that the South China Sea dispute could have significant global consequences