Constantine Vaporis

Constantine Vaporis presents research at University of Pennsylvania Center for Integrated Study of Japan inauguration

In conjunction with the inauguration of University of Pennsylvania’s new Center for the Integrated Study of Japan, Constantine Vaporis presented an invited talk that focused on his research about travel in Early Modern Japan and what it revealed about healing, … Continue reading Constantine Vaporis presents research at University of Pennsylvania Center for Integrated Study of Japan inauguration

Marjoleine Kars

Marjoleine Kars reveals the untold story of the Atlantic Slave Rebellion in the Dutch Caribbean

Note: This story was updated on March 22, 2016. From 1763-1764, nearly 5,000 enslaved people in the Dutch colony of Berbice in South America rebelled. In studying the history of the rebellion on the surface, one might think it fits the … Continue reading Marjoleine Kars reveals the untold story of the Atlantic Slave Rebellion in the Dutch Caribbean

Derek Musgrove

George Derek Musgrove’s research on gentrification in the nation’s capital featured in the Washington Post

In advance of the annual Conference on D.C. Historical Studies, the Washington Post highlighted research by George Derek Musgrove ’97, history, associate professor of history, that identifies four distinct waves of gentrification in Washington, D.C. and reflects residents’ viewpoints of how it has … Continue reading George Derek Musgrove’s research on gentrification in the nation’s capital featured in the Washington Post

Christy Chapin analyzes evolution of American health care system over 20th century

Christy Chapin, an assistant professor of history, recently joined the Harvard University podcast This Week in Health Law for a discussion about the history of health care in the United States. Chapin is author of the new book Ensuring America’s Health: The Public Creation of the Corporate Health Care System, which was published earlier this year by Cambridge University Press. The wide-ranging interview covered several topics including how many ideas to save costs today are similar to ideas presented in the decades spanning the 20th century, what health policy would look like if it were better informed by history, and the validity of the … Continue reading Christy Chapin analyzes evolution of American health care system over 20th century

Christy Chapin, History, Publishes New Book About the History of the American Health Care System

Christy Chapin, an assistant professor of history, recently published a new book which traces how private and public interests merged to place insurance companies at the center of the U.S. healthcare system. The book, Ensuring America’s Health: The Public Creation of the Corporate Health Care System, was published earlier this year by Cambridge University Press. “Christy Chapin’s Ensuring America’s Health changes the scholarly conversation about the history of our health care system. It explains how both public and private forces created Medicare in 1965 and how the ‘insurance company model’ of health care finance has prevailed ever since. This book is the … Continue reading Christy Chapin, History, Publishes New Book About the History of the American Health Care System

UMBC Faculty Discuss Baltimore City Civic Engagement Work in Diverse

In the wake of the unrest in Baltimore earlier this year, several UMBC faculty were interviewed by Diverse to share the projects they are doing with students and colleagues to work with the city as it recovers from its first uprising in nearly 50 years. Beverly Bickel, a clinical associate professor in the language, literacy and culture program, discussed the Imagining America conference, which is sponsored by UMBC in partnership with MICA and Morgan State University. Many conference sessions will focus specifically on Baltimore and address topics such as race, inequality and community-based approaches to spur collective action. “Part of our … Continue reading UMBC Faculty Discuss Baltimore City Civic Engagement Work in Diverse

Joseph Tatarewicz, History, Provides Historical Context for Pluto Flyby Mission in The Conversation

On July 21, Joseph Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history, published an article in The Conversation analyzing the history of space exploration in light of the recent NASA New Horizons Pluto mission. Professor Tatarewicz teaches the history of science and technology, policy, and public history. He has done extensive work in public history, including eight years as a Smithsonian museum curator and ten years in private practice. He is author of Space Technology and Planetary Astronomy.  “The boomers are the first generation to witness the initial exploration of our solar system and the last to be taught that standard phrase, ‘the nine planets.’ During the … Continue reading Joseph Tatarewicz, History, Provides Historical Context for Pluto Flyby Mission in The Conversation

Kate Brown, History, Describes Her Experience Writing Plutopia in Process History Blog

Kate Brown, a professor of history, was recently interviewed by Process, the blog of the Organization of American Historians (OAH), the Journal of American History (JAH), and The American Historian (TAH), about her award-winning book Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford University Press, 2013). The posted interview is in Q&A format and Process asked Prof. Brown about her inspiration, research process, and difficulties in writing the book: “…it was difficult to integrate labor, urban, cultural and environmental history with the history of science and medicine, and to do so in the context of two national histories. I … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, Describes Her Experience Writing Plutopia in Process History Blog

Denise Meringolo, History, Describes Baltimore Uprising Project in the Baltimore Sun

An article published June 18 in the Baltimore Sun examined a digital history project documenting the unrest surrounding the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore. Denise Meringolo, an associate professor of history, is collaborating with the Maryland Historical Society and University of Baltimore to collect images, oral histories, and videos taken by everyday citizens documenting the events. Meringolo, who is featured in the article, set up a website for the project. “I decided to establish a site that allows people to participate directly in the act of collecting,” Meringolo said. “When you study social movements from the past, sometimes what’s missing are … Continue reading Denise Meringolo, History, Describes Baltimore Uprising Project in the Baltimore Sun

Kate Brown, History, Examines Russia’s Foreign Agents Law in Al Jazeera America

In a June 15 op-ed in Al Jazeera America, history professor Kate Brown examined the impact of Russia’s foreign agents law on the country’s civil society and environmental activists. The law requires organizations that receive funding from abroad to register as foreign agents, and the law as it was originally written excluded environmental advocacy groups. However, Brown wrote in her column that the law has recently been used with broad application to abolish NGO’s that prevent development in Russia. “The ease with which the law can be abused could spell disaster both for Russian civil society and environmental regulation.” With the … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, Examines Russia’s Foreign Agents Law in Al Jazeera America

Anne Rubin, History, Gives Voice to Union Soldiers in Sherman’s Army in The Conversation

On Memorial Day, The Conversation published a series of insights into wars that have been waged and their aftermath. Anne Rubin, an associate professor of history, published an article that gave voice to the Union soldiers in Sherman’s Army and their view of their impact on the end of the Civil War. “Sherman’s veterans, at least those who spoke and wrote publicly about their experiences, were remarkably untroubled by the war they made against civilians. They looked at the march not as something that broke the laws of war, but instead as one of the great experiences of their lives,” Rubin wrote. “For … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, Gives Voice to Union Soldiers in Sherman’s Army in The Conversation

Marc Olano, CSEE, and Anne Rubin, History, Describe the Bandit Video Game Project in the Daily Record

A team of professors and students across several disciplines have worked together to develop “Bandit,” a video game in which players control a fox that navigates the streets during Civil War-era Baltimore. The game is one of two developed this semester in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Professor Marc Olano’s game development class. The group collaborated with students in the history department and Anne Rubin, an associate professor of history, to develop viewpoints of diverse actors in the Pratt Street Riots. The work was featured in a Daily Record article published on May 19: “The game-design students initially pitched several game ideas to the history … Continue reading Marc Olano, CSEE, and Anne Rubin, History, Describe the Bandit Video Game Project in the Daily Record

Kate Brown, History, Receives Book Review from Inside Higher Ed and Los Angeles Review of Books

History Professor Kate Brown will soon publish a new book at the end of May on her experiences traveling and conducting research in the Chernobyl Zone of Alienation, the basement of a hotel in Seattle, Ukraine, Russia, and Illinois. The book, titled Dispatches from Dystopia (University of Chicago Press) examines the histories of places that have been silenced, contaminated, or broken and the lives of people who remain in those places. The work recently received a positive review from Inside Higher Ed columnist Scott McLemee. “So for the first several pages of Dispatches From Dystopia I braced myself, only to find that Brown is the … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, Receives Book Review from Inside Higher Ed and Los Angeles Review of Books

Joseph Tatarewicz, History, in the Christian Science Monitor

In light of the 25th anniversary of the launch of the Hubble telescope, Joseph Tatarewicz, an associate professor of history, was quoted extensively in a Christian Science Monitor article and reflected on the hype and drama surrounding the telescope. In the article, Tatarewicz called it a ” “Perils of Pauline” saga with emotional highs and lows, such as the botched-mirror episode. From its very beginning, each time Hubble hit a low, it rebounded, Tatarewicz said, “but before it rebounded, to one degree or another, the future of the agency and spaceflight hung on it. It’s just a good story.” With the telescope’s … Continue reading Joseph Tatarewicz, History, in the Christian Science Monitor

Anne Rubin, History, in the Baltimore Sun

With news coverage this week surrounding the 150th anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s death, the Baltimore Sun published a story examining Catonsville’s connection to Lincoln assassin John Wilkes Booth. The article looked at Booth’s time as a student at St. Timothy’s Hall preparatory school in Catonsville. Anne Rubin, an associate professor of history and author of Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (UNC Press 2014) is quoted in the article and provided perspective on the environment that Booth studied in. “The thing about Maryland was that it was very divided,” said Rubin. The article also states: “Throughout his adolescence, … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, in the Baltimore Sun

Rebecca Boehling, History, Returns to UMBC in 2016

Rebecca Boehling, history, Judaic studies, and gender and women studies, will be returning to UMBC in January 2016. Boehling has been on temporary leave from UMBC in order since the beginning of 2013 to serve as the director of the International Tracing Service (ITS) in Germany, a center that preserves and archives documents on Nazi persecution, forced labor and the Holocaust in Nazi Germany and its occupied regions. In her time in Germany, Boehling worked to transform ITS into an international center for documentation, information and research. Continue reading Rebecca Boehling, History, Returns to UMBC in 2016

Anne Rubin, History, on Tulsa Public Radio

As the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War approaches, Anne Rubin was a guest on Tulsa Public Radio’s “Studio Tulsa” program on April 1 discussing her book Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (UNC Press 2014). Rubin, an associate professor of history, shared her research which examined the stories and myths about Sherman’s March to the Sea. “I started this project really under the spell of the mythologizing of Sherman’s March,” Rubin said, “…so much about what we think of the American Civil War, even today, is very Virginia-centric…and I do think once you shift … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, on Tulsa Public Radio

Social Sciences Forum: Ecological Encounters on the Upper Missouri: The Making of Mandan Indian History (4/8)

Social Sciences Forum Wednesday, April 8 | 4:00 p.m. Elizabeth Fenn, Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery  Elizabeth Fenn’s lecture tells the story of North Dakota’s Mandan Indians, widely known for hosting Lewis and Clark during the winter of 1804-1805. The challenges the Mandans faced included epidemics of smallpox and whooping cough and invasions of Norway rats, which diminished Mandan numbers from more than 12,000 in 1500 to fewer than 300 in 1838. In this talk, Fenn will be speaking about her recent book, Encounters at the Heart of the World: A History … Continue reading Social Sciences Forum: Ecological Encounters on the Upper Missouri: The Making of Mandan Indian History (4/8)

Kate Brown, History, in Time and Al Jazeera America

History professor Kate Brown has been in the news reflecting on two major recent news stories: the death of Russian opposition leader Boris Nemtsov and a Pasco, Washington police shooting case. Brown published op-eds in Al Jazeera America and Time that studied the deeper history behind both incidents to give more meaning and context to the two stories. In her column “Boris Nemtsov died alone,” Brown discussed how much of the news coverage surrounding Nemtsov’s murder mainly focused on his personality and who was responsible for his death, not on his plans for economic reform. “Unfortunately, the funeral coverage of Nemtsov is all about … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, in Time and Al Jazeera America

Anne Rubin, History, in the New York Times, on C-SPAN

Anne Rubin, an associate professor of history and author of Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (UNC Press 2014), recently published an article in the New York Times “Disunion” blog, which follows the Civil War as it unfolded 150 years ago. Titled “Towns Made for Burning,” the article describes Union General William T. Sherman’s March to the Sea in South Carolina: “Sherman did not explicitly order his men to treat South Carolina’s Confederate civilians cruelly, but he did little to dissuade them,” Rubin wrote. Rubin further described the general’s thought process behind the march, including exploiting fear among Southern whites as … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, in the New York Times, on C-SPAN

James Grubb, History, Named Trustee of Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

History Professor James Grubb has been selected to serve as one of three trustees of the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation, a philanthropic foundation headquartered in New York.  According to its website, the The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation “promotes the advancement and perpetuation of humanistic inquiry and artistic creativity by encouraging excellence in scholarship and in the performing arts, and by supporting research libraries and other institutions which transmit our cultural heritage.” The Foundation sponsors projects in four areas in which the founder was keenly interested: libraries, humanities, artistic performance in New York, and Venetian studies.  The annual budget is about … Continue reading James Grubb, History, Named Trustee of Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

George Derek Musgrove, History, in the Washington Post

George Derek Musgrove ’97, history, associate professor of history, was quoted in a February 26 article in the Washington Post that examined Washington, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser’s role in ushering in the legalization of marijuana in the city. Musgrove commented on the relationship between Bowser and Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah), chairman of the committee with jurisdiction over D.C. legislative matters, and noted that Bowser contacted Chaffetz in advance of a press conference this week about marijuana legalization. “Her press conference was impressive. Not only was she firm . . . standing up for the wishes of 7 in 10 voters, but she was shrewd, making … Continue reading George Derek Musgrove, History, in the Washington Post

Kate Brown, History, Awarded ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship, Publishes Op-ed in Time

History Professor Kate Brown has been awarded an American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) Collaborative Research Fellowship to study the long-term effects of low doses of radiation on human health in the context of the Chernobyl disaster nearly three decades ago. Brown will be working with Timothy Mousseau, an evolutionary biologist at the University of South Carolina. The two scholars, with Brown providing the humanist perspective and Mousseau the scientist perspective, will collaborate to explore how knowledge and ignorance of the impact of the disaster has been produced over the last thirty years. The project will aim to historically analyze … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, Awarded ACLS Collaborative Research Fellowship, Publishes Op-ed in Time

Anne Rubin, History, on Journal of American History Podcast

The Journal of American History (JAH) produces a monthly podcast interview with an author of a JAH article or author of a book on a historical topic. Anne Rubin, an associate professor of history and author of Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (UNC Press 2014), was the guest on JAH’s November podcast. She was interviewed about her book and discussed how she first became interested in researching Sherman’s March in graduate school. “The endurance of it is the power of Sherman’s March as a metaphor,” Rubin said. “In the South, people feel it very viscerally obviously in Georgia … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, on Journal of American History Podcast

Kate Brown, History, Named to Physics World 2014 Books of the Year List

History Professor Kate Brown has been named to the Physics World 2014 Books of the Year list for her book Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford University Press, 2013). Physics World is a publication issued by the United Kingdom’s Institute of Physics. Below is an excerpt describing the process for selecting the ten best books of the year: “As in previous years, the entries on our ‘Book of the Year’ shortlist are all well written, novel and scientifically interesting for a physics audience. They represent the best of the 57 books that Physics World reviewed in 2014, being highly commended by external … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, Named to Physics World 2014 Books of the Year List

Anne Rubin, History, on WYPR’s Humanities Connection, Receives Wall Street Journal Book Review

On Thursday, November 20, History Associate Professor Anne Rubin appeared on WYPR’s Humanities Connection to discuss her research and digital humanities project, “Mapping Memory: Digitizing Sherman’s March to the Sea.” The project uses digital storytelling to explore Sherman’s historic 1864 March to the Sea during the Civil War. On December 2, Rubin will further discuss her research with Visual Arts Associate Professor Kelley Bell at the Humanities Forum at UMBC. Earlier this year, Rubin published, Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (UNC Press 2014). In the book, Rubin analyzes stories and myths about Sherman’s March, one of the most symbolically … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, on WYPR’s Humanities Connection, Receives Wall Street Journal Book Review

Constantine Vaporis, Asian Studies, Presents Lecture on the Samurai in Japanese and World History

While on sabbatical this semester, Asian Studies Program Director and History Professor Constantine Vaporis recently presented a lecture at Leiden University in the Netherlands on the Samurai in Japanese and world history. A description of the event can be found below: “It would be difficult to find any aspect of Japanese culture that has had as long and strong a hold on the popular imagination, both in Japan and abroad, than the samurai and the code of ethics and conventions associated with them, known asbushidô. Using literary works, print images, museum exhibitions, film and other elements of popular culture as sources, this lecture … Continue reading Constantine Vaporis, Asian Studies, Presents Lecture on the Samurai in Japanese and World History

Anne Rubin, History, Publishes Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory

Anne Rubin, an associate professor of history, has been presenting a series of talks throughout the fall while on sabbatical. She has been discussing her new book, Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory (UNC Press 2014). In the book, Rubin analyzes stories and myths about Sherman’s March, one of the most symbolically potent events of the Civil War, as a lens for examining how Americans’ ways of thinking about the Civil War have changed over time. Rubin is scheduled to appear on WYPR’s Humanities Connection on November 27 to discuss her interactive online storytelling project, “Mapping Memory: Digitizing Sherman’s March … Continue reading Anne Rubin, History, Publishes Through the Heart of Dixie: Sherman’s March and American Memory

George Derek Musgrove, History, in the New York Times

On October 30, the New York Times published an article about the Washington, D.C. mayoral election and how changing demographics in the District could affect the race. The article notes that a surge of roughly 80,000 new voters in the District in recent years could make the election outcome less certain than many expect. George Derek Musgrove ’97, history, associate professor of history, was interviewed for the article. The excerpt from the story can be found below: “This race has a fascinating set of circumstances,” said George Derek Musgrove, a historian at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who is writing a … Continue reading George Derek Musgrove, History, in the New York Times

Kate Brown, History, Wins the American Historical Association’s 2014 Albert J. Beveridge Award

History Professor Kate Brown has been selected as the winner of the American Historical Association’s 2014 Albert J. Beveridge Award for her book Plutopia: Nuclear Families, Atomic Cities, and the Great Soviet and American Plutonium Disasters (Oxford University Press, 2013). The recognition marks the sixth award Brown has received for Plutopia. The annual Albert J. Beveridge Award honors a distinguished book in English on the history of the United States, Latin America, or Canada, from 1492 to the present. In a press release from the American Historical Association announcing the award, David Hollinger, the 2014 Beveridge Award Committee chair, commented that “[Brown’s book] counters dominant … Continue reading Kate Brown, History, Wins the American Historical Association’s 2014 Albert J. Beveridge Award

George Derek Musgrove, History, in the Washington Post

An article published October 18 in the Washington Post analyzed the Washington, D.C. mayoral election and the state of the race leading up to Election Day on November 4. Council member Muriel Bowser (D-Ward 4) is running against council member David Catania (I-At Large) and early voting is underway. George Derek Musgrove ’97, history, associate professor of history, is writing a book about race and democracy in the District and was interviewed for the article. “There is not a great deal of policy difference between them,” said Musgrove when describing the two mayoral candidates. “They are, quite frankly, running on style,” Musgrove said. “Bowser is trying … Continue reading George Derek Musgrove, History, in the Washington Post

Scott Casper, CAHSS Dean, in Talking Points Memo

On October 9, Talking Points Memo (TPM) published a story analyzing the recent controversial College Board decision to release a revised framework on the way AP U.S. history is taught. Since the decision was released two years ago, it has drawn backlash from many who call the new framework unpatriotic and revisionist. Scott Casper, Dean of the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences and Professor of History, was quoted extensively in the story and commented on recent shifts in American history education. Casper, who edits the “Textbooks and Teaching” section of the Journal of American History, said the debate isn’t exactly new. … Continue reading Scott Casper, CAHSS Dean, in Talking Points Memo

George Derek Musgrove, History, on WAMU’s Metro Connection

On Friday, September 26, WAMU, the NPR affiliate in Washington, D.C., aired a discussion on the history of gentrification and political representation in the nation’s capital. The segment ran on Metro Connection, a weekly news magazine program. George Derek Musgrove ’97, history, associate professor of history, was interviewed for the story and provided historical context and analysis of gentrification in Washington. Musgrove discussed “The Plan,” a concept that newspaper columnist Lillian Wiggins wrote about in the 1970s and believed would transform the city. “She believed that whites in D.C. had a plan to come back and take over the city — … Continue reading George Derek Musgrove, History, on WAMU’s Metro Connection

Anne Sarah Rubin, History, in the Washington Post

An article published September 13 in the Washington Post examines the legacy of Maj. Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman’s March to the Sea during the Civil War. Anne Sarah Rubin, an associate professor of history, was interviewed for the article and provided insight on Sherman’s strategy. “It’s very much about saying, ‘Here’s the power of the Union army,’ ” said Rubin. Sherman’s purpose, she said, was to convey to the South that “you cannot stop us. You cannot resist us. You just need to give up.” She also commented on Sherman’s background, saying he was “a far cry from any kind of abolitionist.” To read the full … Continue reading Anne Sarah Rubin, History, in the Washington Post