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UMBC historian Constantine Vaporis brings samurai scholarship to the public through TED-Ed animation

UMBC’s Constantine Vaporis, professor of history, has partnered with TED-Ed Animations to produce “A Day In The Life of A Teenage Samurai.” This original video draws from over thirty years of scholarship Vaporis has completed on Japanese history and culture, and it’s already received over 550,000 views. Continue reading UMBC historian Constantine Vaporis brings samurai scholarship to the public through TED-Ed animation

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UMBC’s Gloria Chuku is named the 2020 – 21 Lipitz Professor for her research on the Igbo people of Nigeria

Gloria Chuku, chair and professor of Africana studies, has been named UMBC’s Lipitz Professor for 2020 – 21. This distinguished professorship recognizes and supports innovative teaching and research. Chuku will carry out research for her new book project, “Becoming Igbo in Nigeria and the Diaspora: A History of Ethnic Identity Formation and Negotiation.” Continue reading UMBC’s Gloria Chuku is named the 2020 – 21 Lipitz Professor for her research on the Igbo people of Nigeria

Woman wearing "Take Back the Night" t-shirt speaks into a microphone at the center of a group.

Graduating UMBC student advocates keep building community in an unprecedented time

For Nadia BenAissa and Sam Hertl, UMBC has been a place to grow as leaders and advocates. Their college experiences have been defined by their work to educate, speak out, and create resources for survivors of sexual assault and LGBTQIA+ students at UMBC. As the university community has responded to COVID-19 and transitioned to a virtual environment, they have held steadfast in their commitments. Continue reading Graduating UMBC student advocates keep building community in an unprecedented time

Three years in, UMBC’s Inclusion Imperative connects humanities scholars focused on diversity, inclusion, equity, and justice

“The Inclusion Imperative has created real excitement about the benefits of connecting humanities faculty with one another,” shares Jessica Berman, director of the Dresher Center for the Humanities. “Faculty at UMBC have learned a variety of new tools to practice inclusive and engaged teaching.” Continue reading Three years in, UMBC’s Inclusion Imperative connects humanities scholars focused on diversity, inclusion, equity, and justice

In Baltimore Revisited, UMBC and community authors reflect on the city’s history of inequality and resistance

King and Drabinski recognized the need for an updated history of Baltimore, written by and for scholars and community members alike, so they took up the task. “We wanted our work to reach beyond the academy because these histories belong to everyone,” shares Drabinski. “We hope readers can find pieces that speak to them.” Continue reading In Baltimore Revisited, UMBC and community authors reflect on the city’s history of inequality and resistance

2015-2017 Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity

UMBC’s Mejdulene B. Shomali receives Woodrow Wilson Foundation fellowship for research on gender and sexuality in transnational Arab culture

“Most people don’t know there are twenty-two countries in the Arab league. These countries share Arabic as the primary national language. Many are Muslim-majority nations,” shares Shomali. “Many, but not all.” She notes, “There is great linguistic, cultural, ethnic, and religious diversity within the Arab world.” Continue reading UMBC’s Mejdulene B. Shomali receives Woodrow Wilson Foundation fellowship for research on gender and sexuality in transnational Arab culture

“Appreciate the differences”: How study abroad shaped four UMBC student experiences

Many students come to UMBC with the goal of leaving the familiar behind to take on new challenges and gain a fresh perspective. Once they’re on campus, that’s also what inspires some Retrievers to explore international learning opportunities. Balancing course requirements, activities, research, and other responsibilities, while also pursuing study abroad, can prove challenging. But for these four UMBC students earning undergraduate degrees this month, it’s also been transformative. Continue reading “Appreciate the differences”: How study abroad shaped four UMBC student experiences

Student trainer in UMBC t-shirt (at right) chats with a small group of other UMBC students (at left).

UMBC’s newest grads leave a legacy of community-building and support

Meet a few of the many UMBC students graduating this December who exemplify the Retriever spirit of building connections and community by offering a compassionate ear, a helping hand, and a voice of support when it is most needed. Together, these students have created a more inclusive, accessible, and supportive UMBC for everyone, and they continue to reach together to help UMBC grow. Continue reading UMBC’s newest grads leave a legacy of community-building and support

Amy Bhatt shines light on gender and immigration policy in new book High-Tech Housewives

“Now more than ever, Professor Bhatt’s research is crucial in helping all of us understand the everyday impact of high-skilled immigration,” shares Jessica Berman, director of the Dresher Center for the Humanities. “Thriving academic research communities are enriched by the knowledge and expertise highly-skilled international faculty, staff, and students bring and share.” Continue reading Amy Bhatt shines light on gender and immigration policy in new book High-Tech Housewives

UMBC’s 6th Critical Social Justice Week focuses on passion and pathways to have an impact

CSJ: Ignite takes place October 22 – 26, 2018. The week’s programs have been designed both to tap into the passion people already feel for issues that matter to them and to provide pathways for people who haven’t been engaged in traditional forms of activism to see opportunities to have an impact. “It’s about being able to share your strengths and skills for activism and social change, and being able to share the message with others,” says Jess Myers, director of UMBC’s Women’s Center. Continue reading UMBC’s 6th Critical Social Justice Week focuses on passion and pathways to have an impact

National “Humanities for All” initiative features innovative work by UMBC scholars

“Public-engaged humanities are essential to UMBC’s vision, specifically its commitment to civic engagement and social justice,” says Nicole King. “It is essential for our students to show up and to listen to the neighborhoods and communities that surround the university in ways that are honest, respectful, and ethical.” Continue reading National “Humanities for All” initiative features innovative work by UMBC scholars

New test to rapidly diagnose sepsis comes out on top in UMBC’s Cangialosi Business Innovation Competition

Six finalists pitched creative business ideas to a panel of judges during UMBC’s fifth annual Cangialosi Business Innovation Competition (CBIC), held on April 25, 2018 in the new UMBC Event Center. The business ideas ranged from online tools and apps to products with medical applications. Continue reading New test to rapidly diagnose sepsis comes out on top in UMBC’s Cangialosi Business Innovation Competition

UMBC hosts Elect Her leadership training featuring local women in politics

“Over the last five years of running the Elect Her program we have had more women running for SGA office, and more women participate who didn’t know they were going to run or join a campaign. That matters,” says Kate Drabinski, senior lecturer in gender and women’s students. “Whether or not women run for office here, the program reminds all of us that we can do it, that we are the leaders we think we need.” Continue reading UMBC hosts Elect Her leadership training featuring local women in politics

Carole McCann, feminist theory and population politics expert, named 2017 – 18 Lipitz Professor

“Carole McCann’s contributions to UMBC have been simply transformational,” says Dean Scott Casper. As the Lipitz Professor, McCann is set to embark on a complex new research project of both local and national significance: exploring the history and impact of Planned Parenthood of Maryland. Continue reading Carole McCann, feminist theory and population politics expert, named 2017 – 18 Lipitz Professor

UMBC Sondheim Scholar creates the Reach Initiative to support Baltimore teen girls in STEM

The three pillars of the program are mentorship, research, and empowerment. By giving young women training and information, program founder Isabel Geisler ’17 hopes to positively influence participants’ education and career paths. Continue reading UMBC Sondheim Scholar creates the Reach Initiative to support Baltimore teen girls in STEM

Critical Social Justice celebrates UMBC as a home for learning, activism, and social change

In her keynote talk “Body/ Land/ Home: Disability Justice, Healing Justice and Femme of Color Brilliance,” Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha explained how lived experiences can provide a foundation for social justice. Continue reading Critical Social Justice celebrates UMBC as a home for learning, activism, and social change

UMBC to have strong presence at the 2016 Latin American Studies Association Conference

The Latin American Studies Association (LASA) is the largest professional association in the world for individuals and institutions engaged in the study of Latin America. This year, several UMBC faculty across disciplines are organizing conference panel discussions and presenting their research. Continue reading UMBC to have strong presence at the 2016 Latin American Studies Association Conference

UMBC's Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity

Marketplace radio series highlights UMBC faculty diversity initiatives

What will it take to move the dial on the representation of diverse faculty at U.S. colleges and universities? Marketplace, a leading radio program on business and the economy, tackles this question in two new stories highlighting UMBC’s work to train, recruit, hire and retain diverse faculty. Continue reading Marketplace radio series highlights UMBC faculty diversity initiatives

Amy Bhatt

Amy Bhatt describes how Seattle’s South Asian technology workforce is changing the face of global giving

A feature published in the December 2015 edition of Seattle Magazine examines how Seattle’s South Asian population is becoming more visible in the philanthropic community. Amy Bhatt, an assistant professor of gender and women’s studies, researches South Asian migration trends in the … Continue reading Amy Bhatt describes how Seattle’s South Asian technology workforce is changing the face of global giving

2015-2017 Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity

UMBC’s newest Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity pursue game-changing research

Now in its third cohort, UMBC’s Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity program recognizes and supports talented scholars who are emerging as cutting-edge researchers and educators in their fields. UMBC’s newest group of fellows was formally introduced to the university community at a welcome reception held December 10, 2015. Continue reading UMBC’s newest Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity pursue game-changing research

Amy Bhatt featured in PBS documentary on 1965 Immigration Act

In a short documentary produced by KCTS, the PBS affiliate in Seattle, examining the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act and its impact on the Pacific Northwest and the rest of the country’s population, Amy Bhatt described the economic environment that early immigrants in the Northwest encountered. “The Pacific Northwest has a very unique place in American history, because it did offer many of these early South Asians a way to both situate themselves and become economically productive very early on,” Bhatt said in the documentary. “Now, this was also a period in time when we saw a lot of restriction of … Continue reading Amy Bhatt featured in PBS documentary on 1965 Immigration Act

Amy Bhatt, Gender and Women’s Studies, Discusses Her Research on Immigrant Tech Communities in the Seattle Times

In an in-depth Seattle Times story about the difficulty in finding employment that women in immigrant tech communities experience, Amy Bhatt, an assistant professor of gender and women’s studies, was quoted in the article and provided perspective on many of the harsh realities that women in such communities encounter. “It’s very challenging for many of the women who come here as spouses,” said Bhatt, who did her Ph.D. research at the University of Washington on high-tech immigrant communities in the Seattle area. “They are a highly educated group of women, trained in fields like engineering and computer science, coming to what they think … Continue reading Amy Bhatt, Gender and Women’s Studies, Discusses Her Research on Immigrant Tech Communities in the Seattle Times

Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, Reacts to Target Phasing Out Gender-based Signs in Stores on ABC 2 Baltimore

Target recently announced it is moving away from using gender-based signs in its stores such as removing signs featuring suggestions for boys and girls in certain sections and in toy aisles, removing reference to gender, including the use of pink, blue, yellow or green paper on the back walls of shelves. Kate Drabinski, a lecturer of gender and women’s studies, was interviewed by ABC 2 TV in Baltimore about her thoughts on the decision. “It’s kind of sad that it’s such a bold move, but it’s a really bold move especially given how gendered things for kids really are,” she … Continue reading Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, Reacts to Target Phasing Out Gender-based Signs in Stores on ABC 2 Baltimore

Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, Writes About Preserving Baltimore’s LGBTQ History in City Paper

During Pride Week, Kate Drabinski, a lecturer of gender and women’s studies, wrote a column in City Paper about the work being done to document and preserve Baltimore’s LGBTQ history. In her article, Drabinski described the work of several local activists who are conducting research and publishing articles and books related to LGBTQ history in Baltimore, including Louis Hughes, Louise Kelley, Jodi Kelber, April Householder, and Betsy Nix. Drabinski wrote that as gay bars have been closing in Baltimore, the public history work being done should be reflected in contemporary conversations. “Yes, we may be saying goodbye to the Hippo this year, but … Continue reading Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, Writes About Preserving Baltimore’s LGBTQ History in City Paper

Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, Discusses Public Representation of the Civil War in Md. on WYPR

Kate Drabinski, lecturer of gender and women’s studies, was a guest on WYPR’s Maryland Morning on July 10 to discuss how slavery and the Civil War is represented in public spaces in Maryland. Drabinski was joined by Karsonya (Kaye) Wise Whitehead ’09, Ph.D. LLC, an assistant professor in the department of communication at Loyola University-Maryland. The discussion helped listeners think about how the history of slavery is conveyed in Maryland memorials and parks as Gov. Larry Hogan has decided to stop issuing license plates with the Confederate symbol and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is appointing a task force to review the city’s Confederate monuments … Continue reading Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, Discusses Public Representation of the Civil War in Md. on WYPR

Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, on The Marc Steiner Show

Following a series of stories in City Paper about The Wire, WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show held a panel discussion on June 9 to examine the television show and its representation of Baltimore. Kate Drabinski, lecturer of gender and women’s studies, was a guest on the program and discussed the importance of watching the show with a critical mind. “Part of me worries that The Wire is so good in terms of drama that people think watching the show means that they understand the depth of what’s happening in Baltimore and the complexities of the histories here and the complexity of the lives that are lived here,” … Continue reading Kate Drabinski, Gender and Women’s Studies, and Kimberly Moffitt, American Studies, on The Marc Steiner Show

UMBC Faculty Provide Perspective and Reflect on Recent Events in Baltimore

In response to recent events that have transpired in Baltimore over the last several days, several UMBC faculty have engaged in thoughtful reflection and dialogue in the news around the complex challenges facing the Baltimore community. The substantive commentaries come from different viewpoints and add various perspectives to the ongoing conversation of the past week’s events. In The Conversation, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short wrote about three background factors that should be considered when asking why the violence and riots took place in response to the death of one young man: the momentum of the police brutality … Continue reading UMBC Faculty Provide Perspective and Reflect on Recent Events in Baltimore

Rebecca Boehling, History, Returns to UMBC in 2016

Rebecca Boehling, history, Judaic studies, and gender and women studies, will be returning to UMBC in January 2016. Boehling has been on temporary leave from UMBC in order since the beginning of 2013 to serve as the director of the International Tracing Service (ITS) in Germany, a center that preserves and archives documents on Nazi persecution, forced labor and the Holocaust in Nazi Germany and its occupied regions. In her time in Germany, Boehling worked to transform ITS into an international center for documentation, information and research. Continue reading Rebecca Boehling, History, Returns to UMBC in 2016

Amy Bhatt, Gender and Women’s Studies, in The Wall Street Journal

An article published March 20 in the Wall Street Journal’s “Expat” blog looked at the recent growth in numbers of Overseas Citizen of India (OCI) cards, which grant people of Indian origin who have passports in another country lifetime entry into India with several economic benefits. Amy Bhatt, an assistant professor of gender and women’s studies, was quoted in the article and provided historical perspective on OCI cards. “The economic benefits of the OCI scheme, introduced in 2005, made it easier for citizens to keep their economic ties with India while changing to another passport for convenience,” said Bhatt. “Ms. Bhatt’s research … Continue reading Amy Bhatt, Gender and Women’s Studies, in The Wall Street Journal

Humanities Forum: Four Types of Feminist Empiricism (3/26)

Humanities Forum Thursday, March 26 | 4:00 p.m. Evelyn Barker Memorial Lecture Miriam Solomon, Chair and Professor of Philosophy, Temple University University Center, Room 312 “Feminist empiricism” is a general term for a range of positions in philosophy of science that aim to combine empirical methods with the insights of feminism. This talk will give an overview of feminist empiricist work in the natural and social sciences in order to showcase four different ways in which feminist critique can improve scientific work. The relationship between the different feminist empiricisms and feminist standpoint theory will also be discussed. Miriam Solomon is … Continue reading Humanities Forum: Four Types of Feminist Empiricism (3/26)

Humanities Forum: “The Paths We Make As We Go”: The Narrative of an Undocumented Immigrant Woman in the U.S. (3/11)

Humanities Forum Wednesday, March 11 | 4:00 p.m. Joan S. Korenman Lecture Maria Gabriela “Gaby” Pacheco, immigrant rights activist Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery  Activist Maria Gabriela Pacheco is a prominent figure in the national immigrant rights movement and is currently the program director of TheDream.US, a national organization that provides higher education fellowship opportunities for undocumented immigrants. Pacheco is a leading advocate for the passage of comprehensive immigration reform that would assist the approximately 11 million undocumented immigrants currently living in the U.S. She is also a staunch advocate for legislative reform that would provide higher education access to … Continue reading Humanities Forum: “The Paths We Make As We Go”: The Narrative of an Undocumented Immigrant Woman in the U.S. (3/11)

UMBC Humanities Scholars Explore Baltimore History on The Marc Steiner Show

On January 5, WEAA’s The Marc Steiner Show aired a radio series produced by UMBC humanities scholars which examined the people, places, and social movements which have contributed to the history and culture of Baltimore City. The radio series was part of a course taught by Kate Drabinski, lecturer of Gender and Women’s Studies, and Nicole King, associate professor of American studies titled “Place and Public History in Baltimore.” The goal of the series was to dig below the surface and uncover the social history of the city by asking the question: What should the public remember about Baltimore history and why? Several Baltimore … Continue reading UMBC Humanities Scholars Explore Baltimore History on The Marc Steiner Show