Bahama Oriole Project team awarded NSF grant to offer more UMBC undergrads international research experiences

“Being on the Bahama Oriole Project was my first hands-on glimpse at international research,” Matthew Kane ’19 says. “It was the first time I had seen scientists from two different countries collaborating on a conservation project on this scale.” Continue reading Bahama Oriole Project team awarded NSF grant to offer more UMBC undergrads international research experiences

New UMBC research suggests need to rethink goals of global reforestation efforts

Forests store carbon, clean water, prevent soil erosion, and provide habitat for a wide range of species, “but all those benefits start kicking in when forests are older,” says Matthew Fagan. Based on their new research, Fagan and colleagues argue that nations would do better to take the long view when committing to forest restoration. Continue reading New UMBC research suggests need to rethink goals of global reforestation efforts

South Africa to Colorado: Summer research helps UMBC STEM BUILD students chart their course

Traveling far from home for an immersive research experience can be transformational for an undergraduate. Living and working in a completely new environment, with new colleagues, can be intimidating, but it also offers powerful opportunities for growth. Five STEM BUILD students from UMBC took that plunge this summer, and all made lasting memories that will inform their paths forward. Continue reading South Africa to Colorado: Summer research helps UMBC STEM BUILD students chart their course

UMBC’s Matthew Baker teams up with Chesapeake Conservancy to create detailed stream maps

“If we want to understand how what we do on the landscape influences stream integrity and downstream health in places like the Chesapeake Bay,” says Matthew Baker, “then being able to map the connections between human activities on the land and the circulatory waters system that delivers their effects to the Bay is paramount.” Continue reading UMBC’s Matthew Baker teams up with Chesapeake Conservancy to create detailed stream maps

When did humans start to transform Earth? UMBC’s Erle Ellis introduces the Anthropocene.

“We are changing Earth’s climate faster than at any time since the fall of the dinosaurs,” says Ellis. For scientists, he notes, “What’s controversial…is when did this begin? […] When did humans literally become the global shaper of the earth?” Continue reading When did humans start to transform Earth? UMBC’s Erle Ellis introduces the Anthropocene.

UMBC’s Chris Swan featured in The Atlantic for transforming vacant lots in Baltimore

While working in the city comes with challenges, Chris Swan hopes to discover a Goldilocks concoction of plants that tolerate the poor soil found in vacant lots, attract native pollinators, and reduce runoff of contaminant-laced water into the Chesapeake Bay. Continue reading UMBC’s Chris Swan featured in The Atlantic for transforming vacant lots in Baltimore

UMBC dedicates new Earth and Space Institute, building on decades of NASA collaboration

NASA has served as “a role model and inspirational force,” that has led people to reach for the stars for generations, shares Dean Bill LaCourse. “The Earth and Space Institute is our opportunity to reach for new heights,” he says. “To take that chance in the name of science, commitment, passion, and basic human curiosity.” Continue reading UMBC dedicates new Earth and Space Institute, building on decades of NASA collaboration

New study by UMBC’s Chris Swan finds restoration efforts more effective in small, isolated streams

“Our results amplify the call for a larger scale perspective on river restoration,” write Chris Swan and co-author Bryan Brown. That perspective, they suggest, should include considering ecological factors like species dispersal patterns when making restoration decisions. Continue reading New study by UMBC’s Chris Swan finds restoration efforts more effective in small, isolated streams

UMBC announces largest-ever group of Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity

UMBC’s newest Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity will soon begin a two-year experience focused on growing their research and refining their teaching skills through professional development opportunities and working closely with faculty mentors. Continue reading UMBC announces largest-ever group of Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity

New UMBC study highlights importance of multinational conservation efforts for migratory shorebirds

“We’ve seen bird populations plummeting in Australia,” says Colin Studds, “but the thing affecting their populations is actually happening thousands of miles away in China.” Studds’ new study explains that mudflats in the Yellow Sea are critical stopover sites during migration—but they’re disappearing. Continue reading New UMBC study highlights importance of multinational conservation efforts for migratory shorebirds

Erle Ellis asserts value of social sciences in defining onset of human impact on Earth

Anthropocene science is an emerging, interdisciplinary field, which requires a variety of voices be at the table, Ellis argues. Answering the question of when and how humans began transforming Earth might guide us, he suggests, toward “more desirable outcomes both for human societies and for non-human nature.” Continue reading Erle Ellis asserts value of social sciences in defining onset of human impact on Earth

UMBC’s Huemmrich uses NASA satellite to measure effects of climate change on evergreen forests

Will longer growing seasons help slow climate change, or will increased drought speed it up? New research demonstrates a remote-sensing technique has the potential to help us figure that out, and follow-up studies are already putting it to work. Continue reading UMBC’s Huemmrich uses NASA satellite to measure effects of climate change on evergreen forests

Washington Post and WAMU call on Jeffrey Halverson to explain causes of devastating Ellicott City flood

Complex meteorological conditions and other factors contributed to the storm that ravaged Ellicott City July 31, but the town is determined to rebound. Jeffrey Halverson explains how “humble rain…quickly turns deadly,” and Pres. Hrabowski addresses the UMBC community. Continue reading Washington Post and WAMU call on Jeffrey Halverson to explain causes of devastating Ellicott City flood

Urban Water Innovation Network connects UMBC students and faculty with research partners nationwide

The Baltimore Sun highlights UMBC as a university that offers students various research opportunities. UMBC undergraduate students are involved in research that impacts UWIN’s goal of creating solutions to help prepare communities to respond to water crises. Continue reading Urban Water Innovation Network connects UMBC students and faculty with research partners nationwide

Dawn Biehler

UMBC expert examines urban wildlife management questions in New York Times column

Following up on recent sightings of wildlife in the New York City area, The New York Times published an opinion series exploring the question of how urban dwellers should cope with urban wildlife. Dawn Biehler, an associate professor of geography and environmental systems, … Continue reading UMBC expert examines urban wildlife management questions in New York Times column

“Science” article argues Earth has entered a new epoch defined by human impacts on the planet

Robust evidence supports the finding that humanity has entered a new geological era, reports a new paper in Science, co-authored by Erle Ellis, professor of geography and environmental systems. The Anthropocene is defined through the impacts that human activity has … Continue reading “Science” article argues Earth has entered a new epoch defined by human impacts on the planet

NASA’s Operation IceBridge confirms observations on ice shelf collapse, JCET researcher Shuman explains

NASA’s Operation IceBridge, a survey of polar ice, carried out parallel flights in the north and south poles for the first time in seven years. The mission to the Antarctic Peninsula recorded a big drop in height of the two … Continue reading NASA’s Operation IceBridge confirms observations on ice shelf collapse, JCET researcher Shuman explains

UMBC researchers collaborate to improve sustainability, with impacts in Maryland and across the nation

Local sustainability researchers and thought leaders took center stage on October 16, 2015, at a forum for urban sustainability in Baltimore, hosted by UMBC’s School of Public Policy. The forum was designed to examine how collaborations among government agencies, companies, … Continue reading UMBC researchers collaborate to improve sustainability, with impacts in Maryland and across the nation