Congressman Elijah Cummings discusses UMBC’s research leadership and commitment to Baltimore during campus visit

Faculty speak about UMBC’s well-rounded research portfolio and focus in on research strengths in physics, geosciences, space science, and bioengineering; students share career goals and experiences working with local communities. Continue reading Congressman Elijah Cummings discusses UMBC’s research leadership and commitment to Baltimore during campus visit

Justin Velez-Hagan

UMBC economic policy researcher examines the impact of Puerto Rico’s debt crisis

Justin Vélez-Hagan, a Ph.D. student in UMBC’s School of Public Policy and executive director of the National Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce, has been in the news recently after Puerto Rico defaulted on more bond payments, falling deeper into debt. Vélez-Hagan … Continue reading UMBC economic policy researcher examines the impact of Puerto Rico’s debt crisis

Goalkeeper Billy Heavner ’17 receives top academic honor in U.S. college sports

UMBC goalkeeper and men’s soccer co-captain Billy Heavner ’17, financial economics, has been selected to the 2015 Academic All-America Division I Men’s Soccer First Team by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). Heavner is the second UMBC men’s … Continue reading Goalkeeper Billy Heavner ’17 receives top academic honor in U.S. college sports

Dennis Coates weighs costs and benefits of public subsidies for sports franchises in OC Register op-ed

As several NFL franchises are competing to relocate to the Los Angeles area, Dennis Coates, a professor of economics, argues that facts do not support the claim that professional football would be an economic goldmine for Southern California. Coates wrote an op-ed published in The Orange County Register in which he argued public subsidies for professional sports franchises do not always provide the economic boom that officials hope for. In the column, Coates referenced a study he did with a colleague that was recently updated to examine the economic impact of professional sports teams in major cities across the country: “Our findings were … Continue reading Dennis Coates weighs costs and benefits of public subsidies for sports franchises in OC Register op-ed

Economist Douglas Lamdin shares analysis of gold mining stocks

Douglas Lamdin, Economics, had his recent study featured on the website of the American Association of Individual Investors (AAII). The article, “New Evidence on Whether Gold Mining Stocks are More Like Gold or Like Stocks” was co-authored with Mark Johnson of Loyola University, Maryland, and is forthcoming in the journal Alternative Investment Analyst Review. The study examined the role of gold and gold mining stocks in diversified portfolios. Lamdin and Johnson found that neither gold nor gold mining stocks are a hedge against declines in the stock market. Both gold and gold mining stocks, however, do provide diversification benefits, with … Continue reading Economist Douglas Lamdin shares analysis of gold mining stocks

Douglas Lamdin, Economics, Receives NABE Abramson Award

Douglas Lamdin, economics, was selected as the annual recipient of the Abramson Award for the outstanding article published in the past year in Business Economics, the journal of the National Association for Business Economics (NABE). The article, “Gauging the Financial Capability of Americans,” was coauthored with Mark Johnson, a faculty member in the Sellinger School of Business at Loyola University, Maryland. The past two recipients of this award were Lawrence Summers at Harvard University, and John Taylor at Stanford University. Continue reading Douglas Lamdin, Economics, Receives NABE Abramson Award

Social Sciences Forum: Surnames and Social Mobility: Why So Much Persistence of Status Across Generations? (9/8)

Social Sciences Forum Gregory Clark, professor of economics, University of California-Davis  Wednesday, September 9 | 4 p.m. Albin O. Kuhn Library 7th Floor  How much of our fate is tied to the status of our parents and grandparents? Using a novel technique–tracking family names over generations to measure social mobility across countries and periods—renowned economic historian Gregory Clark argues that social mobility rates are lower than conventionally estimated, do not vary across societies, and are resistant to social policies. Sponsored by the Department of Economics.  Continue reading Social Sciences Forum: Surnames and Social Mobility: Why So Much Persistence of Status Across Generations? (9/8)

Christelle Viauroux, Economics, Finds that Mandatory Life Jacket Use Could Reduce Recreational Boating Deaths by 80 Percent

A new study by Christelle Viauroux, an associate professor of economics, found that requiring recreational boat operators to wear life jackets would increase the odds of surviving a boating accident by 80 percent. Viauroux conducted the study with Ali Gungor of the U.S. Coast Guard’s Standards Evaluation and Analysis Division and the findings were published in Risk Analysis. The researchers used data from 2008 to 2011 from the U.S. Coast Guard’s Boating Accident Report Database (BARD) and compared life jacket use to other factors affecting fatalities in recreational boating. A major goal of the research was to assess the impact of … Continue reading Christelle Viauroux, Economics, Finds that Mandatory Life Jacket Use Could Reduce Recreational Boating Deaths by 80 Percent

UMBC Student Entrepreneurship Featured in the Baltimore Sun July Education Supplement

The economics department Student Investment Fund was highlighted in a Baltimore Sun July education supplement article featuring student entrepreneurship at colleges and universities in Maryland. The fund began in 2010: “The primary objective of the fund is to provide participating students an opportunity to gain valuable hands-on experience in security research, valuation of risky assets, asset allocation, and portfolio management, and, in turn, to increase the marketability of UMBC students in industries such as equity research, investment banking, commercial banking and corporate finance,” said Chunming Yuan, an assistant professor of economics and faculty adviser to the program. Bradlee Kilgore ’15, economics, is … Continue reading UMBC Student Entrepreneurship Featured in the Baltimore Sun July Education Supplement

Dennis Coates, Economics, Provides Perspective on Economic Impact of the Baltimore Orioles

With buzz surrounding last week’s 2015 home opener for the Baltimore Orioles at Camden Yards, economics professor Dennis Coates was in the news discussing what the recent success of the team means for business. In a Baltimore Sun article, Coates shared that if the team weren’t doing so well, money spent in and around Camden Yards would simply be spent in other areas of the city. “All we’ve really seen is a shift from one set of entertainment activities to another,” Coates said. “That’s not creating any big boost to the economy; it’s just moving around.” Coates added that out of town visitors … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, Provides Perspective on Economic Impact of the Baltimore Orioles

Social Sciences Forum: Data and Discipline: Sampling the Science of Economic Turnaround (2/12)

On Thursday, February 12 at 4:00 p.m., Peter Blair Henry, Dean of New York University’s Stern School of Business, will present the Social Sciences Forum “Data and Discipline: Sampling the Science of Economic Turnaround.” The event will be held in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. The mathematical underpinnings of the “dismal science” can yield surprising results with the power to impact millions of lives around the globe. Using examples from his book, Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth, Peter Blair Henry discusses how scientific analysis of economic policy experiments can determine which policies, implemented under what conditions, create … Continue reading Social Sciences Forum: Data and Discipline: Sampling the Science of Economic Turnaround (2/12)

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Buffalo News

As the discussion continues surrounding a potential new stadium for the Buffalo Bills, an article published January 24 in The Buffalo News examines the possible economic impact of a major sports and entertainment district in the city’s downtown. Economics Professor Dennis Coates was interviewed for the article and shared that new stadiums don’t necessarily generate job growth and economic development: “If the argument is being put forward that there’s going to be ancillary benefits and job growth discount all of that completely. There’s no evidence that they ever happen,” said Coates. “What I and many others have found is that using stadiums … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Buffalo News

UMBC Welcomed Into CFA Institute University Recognition Program

UMBC has become the latest university to be welcomed into the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) Institute University Recognition Program. The B.S. in Financial Economics program has been acknowledged as incorporating at least 70 percent of the CFA Program Candidate Body of Knowledge (CBOK), which provides students with a solid grounding in the CBOK and positions them well to sit for the CFA exams. This program sets up students well to obtain the CFA designation, which has become the most respected and recognized investment credential in the world. Entry into the CFA Institute University Recognition Program signals to potential students, employers, … Continue reading UMBC Welcomed Into CFA Institute University Recognition Program

Douglas Lamdin, Economics, in Pew Research Center News

An article published December 16 by the Pew Research Center examines the relationship between lower gas prices and consumer confidence in the economy. The article cites research by Douglas Lamdin, professor of economics, and Mark Johnson, a professor at Loyola University Maryland. Their research found a negative relationship between changes in gas prices and their impact on consumer sentiment. The excerpt from the Pew Research Center article can be found below: “[The Pew Research Center] plotted the monthly consumer-sentiment index against the monthly average price of regular gas (adjusted for inflation) and found a moderately strong negative correlation — that … Continue reading Douglas Lamdin, Economics, in Pew Research Center News

Dennis Coates, Economics, in Capital New York

In a recent article published in Capital New York, Economics Professor Dennis Coates discussed the economic impact of Brooklyn’s Barclays Center, home to the New Jersey Nets. The article described how businesses within and immediately surrounding Barclays have been benefiting from the Nets recent move from North Jersey to Brooklyn, but Coates described how it’s unclear that the arena’s impact on business is a sign of economic growth. “Did people not eat dinner before the Barclays Center?” said Coates. “Did they not go out to restaurants before the Barclays Center? They did, just not there.” He added, “if the eating and … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in Capital New York

Dennis Coates, Economics, in City Paper

Baltimore’s City Paper published an article on November 25 that examined the city’s current public construction boom, which by some estimates may exceed $10 billion, comparable to what was spent nationally by the Works Progress Administration during the Great Depression. Economics Professor Dennis Coates was interviewed for the article and explained that the public projects would likely increase the local economic growth rate by close to 15 percent. “It is certainly a construction jobs program, and I would contend it will affect growth positively, though precisely how much, especially in the short term, is questionable,” he said. “Avoiding broken water mains and the … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in City Paper

Tim Gindling, Economics, Interviewed in World Bank Jobs and Development Blog

Tim Gindling, economics, was interviewed for the World Bank Development and Employment blog about his work on self-employment in the developing world. Gindling joined Gary Fields from Cornell University and David Margolis from the University of Paris in an interview focused on why self-employment is so prevalent in developing economies, and what governments could do to improve the standard of living of self-employed workers in those economies. Click here to read “A Better Life for the Developing World’s Self-Employed.” Continue reading Tim Gindling, Economics, Interviewed in World Bank Jobs and Development Blog

Dennis Coates, Economics, Participates in Heinz College Carnegie Mellon University Panel: “Olympic Opportunity: Going for the Gold or Spending in the Red?”

Economics Professor Dennis Coates participated in a panel at Heinz College Washington, D.C., Carnegie Mellon University, on the complex business of bidding for large scale events such as the Olympics. Coates has done extensive research on public choice, public finance, and sports economics. Other panelists included Ngiste Abebe, Co-author, Bidding for Development, Trina Bolton, Co-author, Bidding for Development, and Chris Watts, Managing Director, 4POINT4. The event took place on Thursday, November 13 in Washington, D.C. and the description can be found below: “This panel will explore the complex business of bidding for mega-events. The panelists will weigh a city’s potential for long-term strategic … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, Participates in Heinz College Carnegie Mellon University Panel: “Olympic Opportunity: Going for the Gold or Spending in the Red?”

Scott Farrow, Economics, Named Economics Coordinator for the Department of Homeland Security’s National Center on the Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE)

Economics Professor Scott Farrow has been named part-time economics coordinator for the Department of Homeland Security’s National Center on the Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE). The center was established in 2004 and is an interdisciplinary national research center based at the University of Southern California. The center is comprised of a team of experts from around the country who work to identify where terrorist attacks may occur and what the economic consequences of those attacks may be. On the website announcement that states Farrow will lead CREATE’s economic efforts, it reads: “CREATE researchers are making conceptual and empirical … Continue reading Scott Farrow, Economics, Named Economics Coordinator for the Department of Homeland Security’s National Center on the Risk and Economic Analysis of Terrorism Events (CREATE)

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Baltimore Sun

After the nonprofit Washington 2024, an organization that is supporting bringing the 2024 Summer Olympics to Washington, D.C., recently launched its website, The Baltimore Sun published an article examining what Maryland’s role would be in hosting the Olympics, which still remains largely undefined. Economics Professor Dennis Coates was quoted in the story and said in order for D.C. to manage hosting the Olympics, it would need to host events in Maryland. “I think there is no way D.C. can manage it if they don’t get a buy-in from Maryland,” said Coates. “They’re probably going to use facilities at FedEx [Field].” He … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Baltimore Sun

Tim Brennan FCC Appointment Extended

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has extended the appointment of UMBC public policy and economics professor Tim Brennan as chief economist through December 31, 2014. Dr. Brennan’s appointment is part of an FCC program that brings in scholars from academia to provide outside perspectives and advice on challenging issues. Dr. Brennan has held the position of FCC chief economist since January, 2014. Continue reading Tim Brennan FCC Appointment Extended

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Baltimore Sun and The Buffalo News

As the Buffalo Bills search for a new owner, state and county officials in New York could be faced with a complicated scenario if the new owner arrives with a demand to build a new stadium. An article published July 28 in The Buffalo News examines the question: do taxpayers get their money’s worth by public dollars helping to build sports stadiums?  Considering the situation in Buffalo, Economics Professor Dennis Coates was interviewed for the story and said teams are increasingly getting money from taxpayers to directly help with operating costs of stadiums. One of the arguments for a new stadium in Buffalo … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Baltimore Sun and The Buffalo News

Dennis Coates, Economics, on WAMU’s Metro Connection

Does it make sense to host the 2024 Summer Olympics in Washington, D.C.? Economics Professor Dennis Coates recently shared his thoughts on this question on WAMU’s Metro Connection. The U.S. Olympic Committee has confirmed Washington, D.C. as a finalist to host the Olympics along with San Francisco, Los Angeles and Boston. Coates shared insight on whether the financial investment in hosting the Olympics in D.C. would be worth the return. “By and large most of the cities that hosted saw a decline relative to what would have happened had they not hosted the event,” he said. And the primary reason, he believes, … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, on WAMU’s Metro Connection

Dennis Coates, Economics, on Econ Journal Watch

Economics Professor Dennis Coates was recently a guest on an Econ Journal Watch podcast discussing his research that found economists mostly frown on government subsidies for professional sports franchises, facilities and events. He was a guest on the program with Brad Humphreys, an associate professor of economics at the University of Alberta. During the interview, Coates commented on claims that sports stadiums bring economic benefits and prosperity to cities and their immediate metropolitan areas. “The evidence is that they are minimal at best, and may in fact even be negative,” Coates said. “We think of tangible benefits as job creation and income … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, on Econ Journal Watch

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Daily Iowan

The Daily Iowan’s editorial board recently published a column arguing that the Iowa Senate should reject a $9 million tax break for a motor racing track in Newton, Iowa purchased by NASCAR. The authors contend that accepting tax breaks and appropriating public funds to build and maintain complexes for organizations such as NASCAR can harm the local economy. A study by economics professor Dennis Coates was referenced in the article in which he argued sports welfare negatively impacts local residents because most money generated by sports stadiums ends up going to the owners. “The professional sports environment in the 37 metropolitan … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Daily Iowan

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Sacramento Bee

A proposed NBA arena in downtown Sacramento would have an $11.5 billion economic impact, according to a study commissioned by the mayor’s political action committee. The group is designed to make the case for the city’s proposed $258 million subsidy for the arena. Economics professor Dennis Coates was interviewed for an article in The Sacramento Bee about the report. He argued against studies such as the one in Sacramento, saying sports stadiums simply move money from one part of the city to another as consumers spend money on tickets for sporting events rather than other forms of entertainment. “Basically they … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Sacramento Bee

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The New York Times and Newsday

The Nassau County Legislature unanimously approved a $229 million bid by Forest City Ratner to restore and update the Nassau Coliseum on Monday. Naussau County voters turned down a plan to borrow $400 million to build a new arena two years ago and this deal is intended to save taxpayers the expense of the renovation, but critics wonder if the Coliseum can be successful without the New York Islanders, as the team will move to the Barclays Center after the 2014-15 hockey season. UMBC economics professor Dennis Coates tells The New York Times that he doubts the arena can generate the … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The New York Times and Newsday

Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Baltimore Sun

The U.S. Olympic Committee is expected to decide on a site to propose for the 2024 Summer Games in September 2015. Under the plans DC 2024 — the group exploring a Washington, D.C. bid — Baltimore-area venues would stage Olympic events and Baltimore would support the games with transit and hotel infrastructure. Critics are asking what benefit this would bring to the city and region, and if the costs could outweigh the revenue. Econimcs professor Dennis Coates told The Baltimore Sun that the Olympics are a financial boon to the International Olympic Committee, but not necessarily to the host cities. “The question … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in The Baltimore Sun

Dennis Coates, Economics, on Press Box Online and SB Nation

As Baltimore anticipates the start of the 2013 Grand Prix, a well-known 2011 economic impact analysis by UMBC economics professor Dennis Coates is again making news. The Press Box Online article “What Is Best Way To Measure Grand Prix’s Economic Impact?” notes that race organizers believe the 2012 Grand Prix generated $42.3 million in economic impact for Baltimore and the 2011 event generated $48 million. Coates, however, contested the 2011 figure in a assessment following that year’s Grand Prix, which indicated the impact was approximately $20 million less than the race organizers claimed. The article notes, “Coates’ argument centered on … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, on Press Box Online and SB Nation

Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Baltimore Sun and Wall Street Journal

Towson University’s new Tiger Arena opens tonight. The arena cost $70 million, funded through $20 million in Towson’s reserve funds, combined with bonds paid back through a student fee set aside for construction projects. UMBC economics professor Dennis Coates told the Baltimore Sun that although new arenas generally succeed in increasing the owner’s ability to generate revenue, whether that benefits those who pay for construction is less clear. “It creates a nice buzz,” said Coates, “but otherwise, the impact is spread out.” Coates also commented in a recent Wall Street Journal article on how Brooklyn’s Barclays Center impacts local retailers, … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Baltimore Sun and Wall Street Journal

Scott Farrow, Economics, Publishes “Principles and Standards for Benefit-Cost Analysis”

Economics professor Scott Farrow is co-author and co-editor, with Richard Zerbe, Jr., of the new book, Principles and Standards for Benefit-Cost Analysis (Edward Elgar Publishing 2013). The book website notes: Benefit–cost analysis informs which policies or programs most benefit society when implemented by governments and institutions around the world. This volume brings together leading researchers and practitioners to recommend strategies and standards to improve the consistency and credibility of such analyses, assisting analysts of all types in achieving a greater uniformity of practice. Reviewer John D. Graham of Indiana University writes, “This book is a superb textbook treatment of benefit-cost … Continue reading Scott Farrow, Economics, Publishes “Principles and Standards for Benefit-Cost Analysis”

Dennis Coates, Economics, on NBC Chicago

NBC Chicago’s politics blog “The Ward Room” recently posted an opinion piece affirming Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s decision to refuse to provide public money for a $500 million renovation of Wrigley Field. The writer, Edward McClelland, cited research by UMBC economics professor Dennis Coates that found pro sports reduce a city’s per capita income by putting entertainment dollars into the hands of athletes and team owners who live outside the area rather than local businesses around the stadium. Coates wrote, “money paid to players does not circulate as widely or abundantly as it would were it paid to people with less … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, on NBC Chicago

Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Tampa Bay Times

“How much do the Tampa Bay Rays boost their local economy?” asks the Tampa Bay Times. In arguments for building a new stadium, St. Petersburg mayor Bill Foster estimates the team’s local economic impact at $100 million a year, but experts, including UMBC economics professor Dennis Coates, question the assumption that stadiums have a notable economic benefit to their home cities. Coates explains that when a couple spends $100 for dinner and a movie, much of that money goes to waiters, ticket takers and other local workers and suppliers, who in turn spend their paychecks on rent and food, creating … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Tampa Bay Times

T.H. Gindling, Economics, and Marvin Mandell, Public Policy, in Governing Magazine

A new Governing magazine article examines a recent study by UMBC professors T.H. Gindling (economics) and Marvin Mandell (public policy) on the economic impact of Maryland’s Dream Act, which extended in-county/in-state tuition at local community colleges and public universities to undocumented immigrants who graduate from Maryland high schools and meet other requirements. The article notes that 13 states have similar “tuition equity” laws in place and more than a dozen additional states are considering proposals for them. “As state lawmakers think about offering in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants,” suggests J.B. Wogan, “the UMBC study could offer a model for weighing … Continue reading T.H. Gindling, Economics, and Marvin Mandell, Public Policy, in Governing Magazine

Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Baltimore Sun

Following the Ravens’ Super Bowl win, the team will increase ticket prices at M&T Bank Stadium, reports the Baltimore Sun. Season ticket holders will see an average price increase of 10%, plus a $5 parking rate increase. UMBC sports economist Dennis Coates notes, “In the grand scheme of ticket price changes, I’m not sure that a 10 percent is particularly a big one. But it doesn’t make it any easier for the average fan to pay an extra 10 percent. We’re still in a relatively sluggish economy and there are a lot of people whose income hasn’t changed a whole … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Baltimore Sun

Dennis Coates, Economics, in Bloomberg Businessweek

A new Bloomberg Businessweek article sheds light on tax subsidies that benefit college athletic programs, including hundreds of millions in funding for stadium construction and sports departments’ exemptions from taxes on ticket, television and other income generated by their stadiums. UMBC’s Dennis Coates, professor of economics, argues that college sports may not be the best use of tax exemptions. “When one thinks of charity, they don’t think of charity flowing to the head football coach of a big state university.” Questioning municipal  financing for stadiums Coates notes, “Using the borrowing power of the state and tax-exempt interest to build stadiums … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, in Bloomberg Businessweek

Dennis Coates, Economics, on Sports On Earth and in the Baltimore Sun

A new Sports On Earth commentary by Patrick Hruby quotes UMBC professor Dennis Coates, economics, in arguing that eliminating “sports welfare” among college and professional sports teams and owners would provide an “easy, overdue fix to the nation’s fiscal woes.” Coates believes more money would be available to indebted cities with professional  teams and stadiums if athletes kept their money in the communities where they play, instead of the southern California or south Florida areas where they often live. “If that same money was spent on a movie, dinner, bowling, the theater, a locally-owned bar, tips for bartenders and waitresses, all … Continue reading Dennis Coates, Economics, on Sports On Earth and in the Baltimore Sun

Social Science Faculty Gindling, Mandell, Norris and Hussey in Post-Election News

In the wake of Maryland’s vote for Question 4, UMBC professors T.H. Gindling (economics) and Marvin Mandell (public policy) recently discussed their study, “Private and Government Fiscal Costs and Benefits of the Maryland Dream Act” on NBC Washington news. Their interview highlights the net positive economic impact that each incoming class of undocumented students would have, due to factors such as decreased incarceration rates (and thus lower incarceration costs) for college versus high school graduates. Donald F. Norris, professor and chairman of UMBC’s Department of Public Policy, commented on Maryland’s passage of both Question 6 (approving same-sex marriage rights) and Question … Continue reading Social Science Faculty Gindling, Mandell, Norris and Hussey in Post-Election News

UMBC Study on Economic Impact of Dream Act in National Press Following Vote

On Tuesday, Nov. 6, Marylanders voted to extend in-county/in-state tuition at local community colleges and public universities to undocumented immigrants who graduate from Maryland high schools and meet other requirements. Press following the 59% to 41% Maryland Dream Act victory have cited a recent study on the Dream Act’s economic impacts by UMBC’s T.H. Gindling (economics) and Marvin Mandell (public policy). Their study concludes, “the Dream Act would generate $66 million in economic activity for each incoming new class of undocumented students.” See the website of UMBC’s Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research (MIPAR) for the original working paper: … Continue reading UMBC Study on Economic Impact of Dream Act in National Press Following Vote

UMBC Study on Economic Impact of Dream Act in TIME

Maryland voters will soon decide whether to allow undocumented immigrants who graduate from Maryland high schools and meet other requirements to pay in-county/in-state tuition at local community colleges and public universities. A recent study on the Dream Act’s economic impacts by UMBC professors T.H. Gindling (economics) and Marvin Mandell (public policy) has received significant media attention and today appeared on TIME magazine‘s online coverage of the referendum. TIME notes that Gindling and Mandell’s study concludes, “the Dream Act would generate $66 million in economic activity for each incoming new class of undocumented students.” See the website of UMBC’s Maryland Institute … Continue reading UMBC Study on Economic Impact of Dream Act in TIME

School Board Candidate David Murray ’14, Economics, in the Gazette

Today’s Gazette highlights the Prince George’s County Board of Education race between District 1 candidates David H. Murray ’14, economics, and Zabrina Epps, CCBC academic adviser. Murray told the Gazette, “One of most important things we have to do is try to recruit the most effective teachers we can.” He supports an external audit on the school system’s operating budget, to redirect funds toward increasing teacher pay. As one of three candidates in Prince George’s County who are currently university students, Murray argues that his age and familiarity with the school system as an alumnus afford him an important perspective … Continue reading School Board Candidate David Murray ’14, Economics, in the Gazette