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In “Blood on the River,” UMBC’s Marjoleine Kars examines enslaved people’s accounts of a nearly successful rebellion 250 years ago

Kars’s new book chronicles a rebellion by enslaved people in the Dutch colony of Berbice, 1763 – 1764, thirty years before the Haitian Revolution. Kars says there is “a long tradition of people having different ideas about how to fight oppression and what life should look like at the other side.” Continue reading In “Blood on the River,” UMBC’s Marjoleine Kars examines enslaved people’s accounts of a nearly successful rebellion 250 years ago

A group of woman of different races and ages stand next to eachother smiling at the camera while holding hard cover picture books in their hands. They are standing in between one white and one yellow standup banner with the words Sherman Center written on them.

UMBC’s Sherman Center for Early Learning in Urban Communities is transforming early childhood education in Maryland

UMBC’s Sherman Center for Early Learning in Urban Communities is now in its third year of supporting, strengthening, and expanding early childhood education in Maryland. The center was founded with the support of a $6 million grant from the George and Betsy Sherman Family Foundation in 2017. It has developed a series of research-based initiatives to address the needs of children from birth to eight years old in Maryland, and the workforce dedicated to educating them. Continue reading UMBC’s Sherman Center for Early Learning in Urban Communities is transforming early childhood education in Maryland

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UMBC’s Kindel Nash’s new book shares best practices for culturally sustaining teaching in early education

Culturally sustaining pedagogy, Nash explains, focuses on countering structures that systematically erase the culture and language of communities of color. Her book is an example of the impact teachers can have when they commit to this work. “This includes not only changing how we teach,” she says, “but whom we teach with.” Continue reading UMBC’s Kindel Nash’s new book shares best practices for culturally sustaining teaching in early education

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Chinese American parents and children have experienced increased racism due to COVID-19, report UMBC researchers in Pediatrics

A team of researchers led by UMBC psychology professor Charissa Cheah has found that a high percentage of Chinese American parents and children have witnessed and experienced an increase in racial discrimination since the outbreak of COVID-19. The researchers’ findings are now published in Pediatrics. Continue reading Chinese American parents and children have experienced increased racism due to COVID-19, report UMBC researchers in Pediatrics

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UMBC’s Taka Yamashita receives $1.4 million grant for research supporting workers returning to community college

UMBC’s Taka Yamashita has been awarded a $1.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education’s Institute of Education Sciences for an innovative three-year research project on how adult literacy impacts success in community college STEM education and job training programs. Yamashita is an associate professor of sociology and faculty member in the UMBC/UMB gerontology Ph.D. program. Continue reading UMBC’s Taka Yamashita receives $1.4 million grant for research supporting workers returning to community college

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UMBC historian Constantine Vaporis brings samurai scholarship to the public through TED-Ed animation

UMBC’s Constantine Vaporis, professor of history, has partnered with TED-Ed Animations to produce “A Day In The Life of A Teenage Samurai.” This original video draws from over thirty years of scholarship Vaporis has completed on Japanese history and culture, and it’s already received over 550,000 views. Continue reading UMBC historian Constantine Vaporis brings samurai scholarship to the public through TED-Ed animation

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UMBC’s Gloria Chuku is named the 2020 – 21 Lipitz Professor for her research on the Igbo people of Nigeria

Gloria Chuku, chair and professor of Africana studies, has been named UMBC’s Lipitz Professor for 2020 – 21. This distinguished professorship recognizes and supports innovative teaching and research. Chuku will carry out research for her new book project, “Becoming Igbo in Nigeria and the Diaspora: A History of Ethnic Identity Formation and Negotiation.” Continue reading UMBC’s Gloria Chuku is named the 2020 – 21 Lipitz Professor for her research on the Igbo people of Nigeria

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UMBC’s Lucy Wilson, an infectious disease transmission expert, helps governors and the public respond to COVID-19

For more than a decade, Wilson has served as a public health expert on disease response and public health planning at the international, national, and state levels. When the NGA called, she joined an interdisciplinary team of experts in developing “The Roadmap to Recovery: A Public Health Guide for Governors.” Continue reading UMBC’s Lucy Wilson, an infectious disease transmission expert, helps governors and the public respond to COVID-19