UMBC students set new record in prestigious Goldwater Scholarships for STEM research

Four UMBC students have been named 2021-2022 Goldwater Scholars, setting a new university record for the most Retrievers to earn this prestigious undergraduate award in a single year. “The impact that these students will have in their respective fields is immense, and they are ready for the challenge,” says April Householder, director of undergraduate research and prestigious scholarships. Continue reading UMBC students set new record in prestigious Goldwater Scholarships for STEM research

UMBC’s Ryan Kramer confirms human-caused climate change with direct evidence for first time

Sixteen years of continuous data from NASA’s CERES mission confirm that humans’ role in climate change, indicated by a quantity known as the “radiative forcing,” is the driving factor pulling Earth’s energy budget out of balance. “As far as we can see, the long-term trend in the CERES record seems to be almost entirely accounted for by the radiative forcing,” Ryan Kramer says. Continue reading UMBC’s Ryan Kramer confirms human-caused climate change with direct evidence for first time

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URCAD 2021 showcases creativity, resilience of UMBC student researchers

Due to the constraints of COVID, student researchers have become even more creative in using technology not just to display their research, but to pursue their research at a time when in-person interviews, fieldwork, and traditional performances aren’t possible. Students learned to do interviews online and navigated lab research within physical distancing guidelines. They also responded to the pandemic by examining the changes in society and in themselves. Continue reading URCAD 2021 showcases creativity, resilience of UMBC student researchers

Meet “The Terminator”: UMBC-led research connects solar cycle with climate predictions in a new way

Understanding “the terminator” phenomenon may facilitate prediction of weather patterns such as La Niña and El Niño, which affect everything from the likelihood of severe hurricanes to the success of the growing season, several years in advance. The name was an easy choice, lead scientist Robert Leamon says. “It indicates the death of a solar cycle, and, because it’s predictable, it will, as always, ‘be back.’” Continue reading Meet “The Terminator”: UMBC-led research connects solar cycle with climate predictions in a new way

Kizzmekia Corbett ’08 talks to CNN about Meyerhoff Scholars, vaccine hesitancy

“Had I not been exposed to Dr. Hrabowski and the Meyerhoff Program…I’m not even so sure that I would be a scientist. It’s really about exposure and resources given to people,” Kizzmekia Corbett told CNN. In particular, encounters at UMBC that led her to double major in biological sciences and sociology uniquely prepared her for this moment. Continue reading Kizzmekia Corbett ’08 talks to CNN about Meyerhoff Scholars, vaccine hesitancy

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UMBC celebrates U.S. News Best Grad School rankings in engineering, public affairs

In the latest national U.S. News Graduate School rankings, UMBC has top-100 programs in public affairs and several engineering fields. Engineering is one of a few areas where rankings also reflect the opinions of professionals who hire or work with new graduates. Continue reading UMBC celebrates U.S. News Best Grad School rankings in engineering, public affairs

UMBC researchers work to advance neurotechnology through emerging consortium

To tackle questions about how the brain signals body movements, Ramana Vinjamuri, CSEE, is gathering a team of UMBC researchers and corporate and government partners. He received an Industry University Cooperative Research Center planning grant from NSF in 2020, and he sees UMBC as perfectly situated to move this kind of high-impact research collaboration forward. Continue reading UMBC researchers work to advance neurotechnology through emerging consortium

UMBC’s Anthony Johnson honored for decades of research, mentorship, service

Anthony Johnson has received the Stephen D. Fantone Distinguished Service Award from the Optical Society. His long-term commitment to optics includes major research achievements, dedicated mentoring to students from all backgrounds, and leadership roles in several professional organizations. Continue reading UMBC’s Anthony Johnson honored for decades of research, mentorship, service

UMBC offers new Research Experiences for Undergraduates in smart computing, big data

The Research Experience for Undergraduates in Smart Computing and Communications will bring together a cohort of 10 undergraduate students to participate in a paid 10-week, full-time research experience from June 7 to August 13. While the summer 2021 program will be remote, each student will work closely with a research group and mentor. Continue reading UMBC offers new Research Experiences for Undergraduates in smart computing, big data

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UMBC’s James Foulds receives NSF CAREER Award to improve the fairness, robustness of AI

Implementing an AI algorithm is often presented as a trade-off, Foulds explains. Do you want the program to be as productive as possible or as fair as possible? Foulds sees this as a false and harmful dichotomy. His research shows that developing an AI algorithm that prioritizes fairness can in fact yield more robust results. Continue reading UMBC’s James Foulds receives NSF CAREER Award to improve the fairness, robustness of AI

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UMBC rapidly expands live online peer tutoring to include computing fields

When Amanda Knapp heard last fall from Anupam Joshi, professor and chair of computer science and electrical engineering, that his department wanted to offer online tutoring to students in their courses, she was ready to help make it happen. COVID or no COVID, she says, “It just made sense.” Just a few months after the partnership began, it expanded to include courses in information systems, and it continued to grow. Continue reading UMBC rapidly expands live online peer tutoring to include computing fields

New UMBC-UMB collaborations include research to reduce stress among long-term care workers

The Accelerated Translational Incubator Pilot (ATIP) Program has selected four new interdisciplinary projects by UMBC and UMB researcher partners, each a fresh take on a complex challenge. One will examine how to predict and manage stress in healthcare workers who work in long-term care facilities. Continue reading New UMBC-UMB collaborations include research to reduce stress among long-term care workers

UMBC student research offers hope for critically endangered Bahama Oriole

On a low-lying island in the Caribbean, the future of the critically endangered Bahama Oriole just got a shade brighter. A new study co-led by Michael Rowley estimates that there are at least 10 times as many Bahama Orioles as scientists previously thought. Rowley’s results are the latest in a string of important discoveries led by undergraduates mentored by Kevin Omland. Continue reading UMBC student research offers hope for critically endangered Bahama Oriole

UMBC launches Biotech Boot Camp to train workers displaced by COVID-19 for in-demand jobs

While some industries have lost jobs during the pandemic, the biotech industry has seen explosive growth. This new program seeks to address a mismatch between available workers and available jobs. Setting people up to succeed in well-paying new jobs and simultaneously filling the gap in the biotech workforce “is a win-win that we’re really excited to be a part of,” Annica Wayman says. Continue reading UMBC launches Biotech Boot Camp to train workers displaced by COVID-19 for in-demand jobs

Low-cost infant incubator developed at UMBC completes successful clinical trial in India

A standard incubator found in a newborn ICU costs between $1,500 and $35,000—beyond the means of many hospitals in low- and middle-income countries. This new UMBC-designed incubator costs only $200 and has performed on par with a standard incubator in its first clinical trial. Continue reading Low-cost infant incubator developed at UMBC completes successful clinical trial in India

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UMBC faculty, alumni entrepreneurs receive record number of MIPS awards for tech collaborations

Six UMBC faculty members have just received grants from the Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) program to develop new technologies with potential to grow the state’s economy. This is UMBC’s largest number of winning proposals within a single proposal round since MIPS began. Continue reading UMBC faculty, alumni entrepreneurs receive record number of MIPS awards for tech collaborations

UMBC researchers use AI to help businesses understand complex legal docs, like the Code of Federal Regulations

Businesses that work with the federal government must comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, a binding legal document. Its length and complexity cause challenges for many, so this automation process provides a way to improve understanding and accessibility, explains UMBC’s Karuna Joshi. Continue reading UMBC researchers use AI to help businesses understand complex legal docs, like the Code of Federal Regulations

Quantum computing, but even faster? UMBC researchers explore the possibilities with new NSF grant

Quantum computers have the potential to revolutionize communications, cybersecurity, and more. But as Sebastian Deffner notes, “Even quantum computing has shortcomings.” Deffner and Nathan Myers will explore ways to work around some of quantum computing’s limits with a new NSF grant. And in the process, they just might redefine the fundamental laws of physics. Continue reading Quantum computing, but even faster? UMBC researchers explore the possibilities with new NSF grant

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UMBC’s Danyelle Ireland is named a national Rising Star as champion for transfer students

This award honors Ireland’s years mentoring and advocating for UMBC transfer students in information technology and engineering fields. It also brings greater visibility to UMBC’s transfer student population and to how the university can most effectively support their success. Continue reading UMBC’s Danyelle Ireland is named a national Rising Star as champion for transfer students

UMBC students help create richer online courses for peers in engineering and computing fields

As UMBC faculty prepare for spring, they are reflecting on lessons learned from a primarily online fall 2020 semester. In UMBC’s College of Engineering and Information Technology (COEIT), this means honoring teaching fellows and teaching assistants for their role in making sure courses met student needs. Continue reading UMBC students help create richer online courses for peers in engineering and computing fields

UMBC’s Translational Life Science Technology program wins Workforce Champion of the Year

UMBC’s newest undergraduate program has been recognized for its contributions to enhancing the regional biotech workforce. A partnership with Montgomery College, the program’s interdisciplinary approach prepares students for a wide range of biotech careers. Continue reading UMBC’s Translational Life Science Technology program wins Workforce Champion of the Year

UMBC’s newest biotech grads launch careers that will make a difference

UMBC’s Translational Life Science Technology degree is one of UMBC’s newest academic programs. The interdisciplinary program “is different from other majors,” says Titina Sirak ’20, “because you take a whole range of classes. It helps you open up your mind to different sides of biotech.” Continue reading UMBC’s newest biotech grads launch careers that will make a difference

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BARD Fund honors UMBC’s Yonathan Zohar for aquaculture research with $12B global economic impact

Yonathan Zohar has stayed in Baltimore for 30 years because the environment is conducive to research that has a positive societal impact. His early work enabled the growth of the aquaculture industry, and today he continues to develop ground-breaking sustainable, land-based aquaculture processes. Continue reading BARD Fund honors UMBC’s Yonathan Zohar for aquaculture research with $12B global economic impact

HackUMBC goes virtual in a big way, attracting over 1,000 students

More than 1,000 students from institutions across the country and around the world—from as far away as Kazakhstan, Albania, Spain, and Nigeria—logged onto their computers for a 36-hour hackathon organized by UMBC students, November 13-15. HackUMBC’s events typically draw huge crowds overflowing conference spaces. This year, the event was held virtually for the first time due to COVID-19. Continue reading HackUMBC goes virtual in a big way, attracting over 1,000 students

UMBC chemical engineering students take second place in national Jeopardy competition

Last weekend, four UMBC students earned second prize in the national Jeopardy competition hosted virtually by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). The team competed against 12 other teams at the national level after winning the Mid-Atlantic regional competition in October. Continue reading UMBC chemical engineering students take second place in national Jeopardy competition

UMBC’s Alan Sherman and collaborators develop strategy for secure online voting in future U.S. elections

Researchers from UMBC and xx.network have been working to design an online voting system that is resistant to coercion and would provide a secure way for people to cast their ballots from computers, tablets, and smartphones in the future. Continue reading UMBC’s Alan Sherman and collaborators develop strategy for secure online voting in future U.S. elections

American Chemical Society honors UMBC’s Lee Blaney for commitment to mentoring student researchers

UMBC’s Lee Blaney was honored for his impact as a chemistry educator and mentor who closely involves students of all levels in collaborative research. Blaney received the 2020 George L. Braude Award from the Maryland section of the American Chemical Society. Continue reading American Chemical Society honors UMBC’s Lee Blaney for commitment to mentoring student researchers

Entrepreneurs and experts gather for bwtech@UMBC Cybertini event on election security

Nearly 100 industry experts and entrepreneurs gathered virtually for Cybertini 2020, hosted by bwtech@UMBC, UMBC’s research and technology park, on October 15. The annual event offers a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs to learn from industry professionals and experts in academia, and this year focused on cybersecurity related to elections. Continue reading Entrepreneurs and experts gather for bwtech@UMBC Cybertini event on election security

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NASA awards UMBC team $1.4M to develop AI that improves how computers process climate data from satellites

“Now we have so much raw data. So how do we analyze it? How do we make it useful for the research community?” asks Jianwu Wang. As data archives balloon, the capabilities of artificial intelligence are rapidly increasing. There is also an urgent need to understand Earth’s systems as they shift due to climate change. All of these factors drove Wang and his collaborators to find ways to help researchers access satellite data much faster. Continue reading NASA awards UMBC team $1.4M to develop AI that improves how computers process climate data from satellites

UMBC receives $900K from Maryland E-nnovation Initiative Fund to bolster Sinha Professorship in Statistics

Professor Bimal Sinha, who founded UMBC’s statistics department in 1985, is a beloved and decorated faculty member who has helped transform UMBC into a national leader in statistics education. He’s also transformed the lives of countless students, some of whom have gone on to become leading statisticians around the globe. Continue reading UMBC receives $900K from Maryland E-nnovation Initiative Fund to bolster Sinha Professorship in Statistics

As demand for telemedicine swells, UMBC researchers develop strategies to scale-up services

UMBC researchers have received a nearly $150,000 planning grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to study how telemedicine can be scaled more effectively, including meeting the complex training needs of medical professionals. Continue reading As demand for telemedicine swells, UMBC researchers develop strategies to scale-up services

bwtech@UMBC receives Economic Development Administration grant to launch cybersecurity venture fellowship program

bwtech@UMBC, UMBC, and the University System of Maryland will create the Maryland New Venture Fellowship for Cybersecurity to support the development of cybersecurity companies in Maryland, and increase connections among technologists, mentors, and faculty at institutions across the state. Continue reading bwtech@UMBC receives Economic Development Administration grant to launch cybersecurity venture fellowship program

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UMBC’s Tara LeGates is first runner-up for prestigious international neurobiology prize

“I’m really interested in how the brain integrates a lot of different kinds of information to regulate complex behaviors, such as seeking rewards,” LeGates says. Her findings published in Nature, and her lab’s continuing work, pave the way for new treatments for disorders such as addiction and depression. Continue reading UMBC’s Tara LeGates is first runner-up for prestigious international neurobiology prize

Research team led by UMBC’s Mark Marten studies how fungal cells respond to stress, repair broken cell walls

Fungi play an important role in the development of pharmaceuticals and enzymes, and agriculture. By understanding how fungal cells work and respond to stress, Mark Marten and his collaborators hope to help reverse-engineer processes that could have a broad range of applications. Continue reading Research team led by UMBC’s Mark Marten studies how fungal cells respond to stress, repair broken cell walls

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Chinese American parents and children have experienced increased racism due to COVID-19, report UMBC researchers in Pediatrics

A team of researchers led by UMBC psychology professor Charissa Cheah has found that a high percentage of Chinese American parents and children have witnessed and experienced an increase in racial discrimination since the outbreak of COVID-19. The researchers’ findings are now published in Pediatrics. Continue reading Chinese American parents and children have experienced increased racism due to COVID-19, report UMBC researchers in Pediatrics