Adrian Davey to research renewable energy and photo-electrochemical synthesis in UC Berkeley Ph.D. program

Adrian Davey
B.S., Chemical Engineering
Magna Cum Laude
Hometown: Frederick, Maryland
Plans: Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley

This institution cultivated my scientific passion and inspired me to poise myself as a rising engineer committed to championing diversity in STEM and adding research-oriented novelty to chemical engineering.

As a Meyerhoff Scholar at UMBC, Adrian Davey has been committed to training as a researcher, and incorporating service into his studies, from day one. He pursued research at the University of Texas at Austin as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Exceptional Research Opportunities Scholar, and at UC Berkeley as an Amgen Scholar, in addition to his research in the lab of Chris Hennigan, assistant professor of chemical, biochemical, and environmental engineering, at UMBC.

Recognizing his academic and research strengths, Davey was invited to be a part of the Phi Kappa Phi Honor Society, UMBC’s all-discipline honor society, and was named a scholar of the American Chemical Society. He also earned third place in the Technical Research Exhibition at the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) Fall Regional Conference in 2017 and is a member of Tau Beta Pi, UMBC’s engineering honors society.

Adrian Davey presented his summer 2017 research at the UC Berkeley, during his time as an Amgen Scholar. His work explored how the use of graphene-based catalysts to synthesize hydrogen peroxide can impact water decontamination efforts. Photo courtesy of Adrian Davey.

Outside of the lab, Davey has pursued leadership opportunities and mentored high school students through student organizations both on campus and in the local community. He served as president of the UMBC chapter of the NSBE and worked with students at Mount Hebron High School through an SAT preparation and mentorship program.

After graduation, Davey will begin a Ph.D. program in chemical engineering as a Chancellor’s Fellow at UC Berkeley. He will continue to research how to improve oxygen-reduction reactions for more efficient and clean hydrogen peroxide formation. A possible application of this work could support more efficient water decontamination.

Portrait by Marlayna Demond ’11 for UMBC.