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UMBC’s Faith Davis is named a 2021 Newman Civic Fellow for work on healthcare, food, and housing insecurity

Faith Davis ‘22, M30, sociology and biological sciences, grew up in Mechanicsville, a small town in Maryland. Her family regularly welcomed people in need of temporary housing into their home. This shaped her sense of how housing and income insecurity … Continue reading UMBC’s Faith Davis is named a 2021 Newman Civic Fellow for work on healthcare, food, and housing insecurity

UMBC’s Jordan Troutman to continue algorithmic fairness research as Knight-Hennessy Scholar at Stanford

Jordan Troutman’s experience as a Meyerhoff Scholar and member of the Honors College, and involvement with the National Society for Black Engineers, Student Government Association, and Center for Democracy and Civic Life have all informed his UMBC experience, where he’s had space to develop his authentic self and build confidence that he can do impactful work. “I think that’s the beauty of this school,” Troutman shares. “You can be whoever you want.” Continue reading UMBC’s Jordan Troutman to continue algorithmic fairness research as Knight-Hennessy Scholar at Stanford

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UMBC education faculty and partners work to humanize K-12 distance learning

“We value the humanizing practices that are often embedded in the teaching practices of Black teachers,” explains Keisha McIntosh Allen, assistant professor of language and literacy education. “This is an opportunity for them to lead and share their knowledge, which is often overlooked by teacher evaluations that do not acknowledge these approaches to teaching.” Continue reading UMBC education faculty and partners work to humanize K-12 distance learning

UMBC’s Anthony Johnson, pulse laser innovator, elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

Being elected as a member of the Academy is one of the highest honors a scholar can receive. Founded in 1780, its members, who come from every field of study, “examine new ideas [and] address issues of importance to the nation and the world.” Anthony Johnson has spent his career dedicated equally to creative applications of ultrashort pulse lasers and to teaching and mentorship. Continue reading UMBC’s Anthony Johnson, pulse laser innovator, elected a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences

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UMBC Mock Trial defeats Yale to win first national championship

On the evening of April 18, UMBC defeated Yale University to win the American Mock Trial Association National Championship for the first time in program history. The suspenseful final round was a nail-biter for Retriever fans tuning in online. “I’m always confident in my team’s ability,” says team member Thomas Azari ’22. “But I was on the edge of my seat.” Continue reading UMBC Mock Trial defeats Yale to win first national championship

UMBC Event Center partnership launches new chapter in Retriever history with a new name

The UMBC Event Center has become synonymous with high-level athletic play, premier entertainment, and university milestones since opening in 2018. This spring, UMBC has officially announced the beginning of a new chapter for the Event Center—a new name. The Chesapeake Employers Insurance Arena, a new partnership between UMBC and Chesapeake Employers’ Insurance Company, will open doors for both the university and the facility. Continue reading UMBC Event Center partnership launches new chapter in Retriever history with a new name

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UMBC’s Erle Ellis and international team show people have shaped Earth’s ecology for 12,000 years

“Our work shows that most areas depicted as ‘untouched,’ ‘wild,’ and ‘natural’ are actually areas with long histories of human inhabitation and use,” says UMBC’s Erle Ellis, professor of geography and environmental systems and lead author.
Continue reading UMBC’s Erle Ellis and international team show people have shaped Earth’s ecology for 12,000 years

UMBC students set new record in prestigious Goldwater Scholarships for STEM research

Four UMBC students have been named 2021-2022 Goldwater Scholars, setting a new university record for the most Retrievers to earn this prestigious undergraduate award in a single year. “The impact that these students will have in their respective fields is immense, and they are ready for the challenge,” says April Householder, director of undergraduate research and prestigious scholarships. Continue reading UMBC students set new record in prestigious Goldwater Scholarships for STEM research

UMBC’s Ryan Kramer confirms human-caused climate change with direct evidence for first time

Sixteen years of continuous data from NASA’s CERES mission confirm that humans’ role in climate change, indicated by a quantity known as the “radiative forcing,” is the driving factor pulling Earth’s energy budget out of balance. “As far as we can see, the long-term trend in the CERES record seems to be almost entirely accounted for by the radiative forcing,” Ryan Kramer says. Continue reading UMBC’s Ryan Kramer confirms human-caused climate change with direct evidence for first time

UMBC volleyball makes program history, returns to NCAA tournament for the first time since ‘98

“History-making” is a term that’s become synonymous with UMBC athletics over the last few years, and UMBC women’s volleyball has exemplified that spirit this spring. On April 2, they took on UAlbany to win their first America East Championship in program history. Continue reading UMBC volleyball makes program history, returns to NCAA tournament for the first time since ‘98

Meet “The Terminator”: UMBC-led research connects solar cycle with climate predictions in a new way

Understanding “the terminator” phenomenon may facilitate prediction of weather patterns such as La Niña and El Niño, which affect everything from the likelihood of severe hurricanes to the success of the growing season, several years in advance. The name was an easy choice, lead scientist Robert Leamon says. “It indicates the death of a solar cycle, and, because it’s predictable, it will, as always, ‘be back.’” Continue reading Meet “The Terminator”: UMBC-led research connects solar cycle with climate predictions in a new way

Kizzmekia Corbett ’08 talks to CNN about Meyerhoff Scholars, vaccine hesitancy

“Had I not been exposed to Dr. Hrabowski and the Meyerhoff Program…I’m not even so sure that I would be a scientist. It’s really about exposure and resources given to people,” Kizzmekia Corbett told CNN. In particular, encounters at UMBC that led her to double major in biological sciences and sociology uniquely prepared her for this moment. Continue reading Kizzmekia Corbett ’08 talks to CNN about Meyerhoff Scholars, vaccine hesitancy

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UMBC celebrates U.S. News Best Grad School rankings in engineering, public affairs

In the latest national U.S. News Graduate School rankings, UMBC has top-100 programs in public affairs and several engineering fields. Engineering is one of a few areas where rankings also reflect the opinions of professionals who hire or work with new graduates. Continue reading UMBC celebrates U.S. News Best Grad School rankings in engineering, public affairs

UMBC-Montgomery College collaboration expands with digital storytelling humanities internship for transfer students

The heart of the internship program “is about building meaningful relationships between Montgomery College students and UMBC faculty and staff as a bridge to university life,” says Sarah Jewett. It’s a mentoring process that reveals what is possible at UMBC and beyond. Continue reading UMBC-Montgomery College collaboration expands with digital storytelling humanities internship for transfer students

UMBC researchers work to advance neurotechnology through emerging consortium

To tackle questions about how the brain signals body movements, Ramana Vinjamuri, CSEE, is gathering a team of UMBC researchers and corporate and government partners. He received an Industry University Cooperative Research Center planning grant from NSF in 2020, and he sees UMBC as perfectly situated to move this kind of high-impact research collaboration forward. Continue reading UMBC researchers work to advance neurotechnology through emerging consortium

UMBC’s Anthony Johnson honored for decades of research, mentorship, service

Anthony Johnson has received the Stephen D. Fantone Distinguished Service Award from the Optical Society. His long-term commitment to optics includes major research achievements, dedicated mentoring to students from all backgrounds, and leadership roles in several professional organizations. Continue reading UMBC’s Anthony Johnson honored for decades of research, mentorship, service

UMBC offers new Research Experiences for Undergraduates in smart computing, big data

The Research Experience for Undergraduates in Smart Computing and Communications will bring together a cohort of 10 undergraduate students to participate in a paid 10-week, full-time research experience from June 7 to August 13. While the summer 2021 program will be remote, each student will work closely with a research group and mentor. Continue reading UMBC offers new Research Experiences for Undergraduates in smart computing, big data

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UMBC’s James Foulds receives NSF CAREER Award to improve the fairness, robustness of AI

Implementing an AI algorithm is often presented as a trade-off, Foulds explains. Do you want the program to be as productive as possible or as fair as possible? Foulds sees this as a false and harmful dichotomy. His research shows that developing an AI algorithm that prioritizes fairness can in fact yield more robust results. Continue reading UMBC’s James Foulds receives NSF CAREER Award to improve the fairness, robustness of AI

UMBC Mock Trial heads to national semifinal as undefeated regional champions

“This year’s team, they’re not afraid of anyone,” says UMBC Mock Trial head coach Ben Garmoe ‘13. “They will go into every round knowing they have a shot.” Garmoe’s confidence in the team is rooted in their strong performance this season, capping years of steady growth into a national powerhouse. Continue reading UMBC Mock Trial heads to national semifinal as undefeated regional champions

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UMBC rapidly expands live online peer tutoring to include computing fields

When Amanda Knapp heard last fall from Anupam Joshi, professor and chair of computer science and electrical engineering, that his department wanted to offer online tutoring to students in their courses, she was ready to help make it happen. COVID or no COVID, she says, “It just made sense.” Just a few months after the partnership began, it expanded to include courses in information systems, and it continued to grow. Continue reading UMBC rapidly expands live online peer tutoring to include computing fields

New UMBC-UMB collaborations include research to reduce stress among long-term care workers

The Accelerated Translational Incubator Pilot (ATIP) Program has selected four new interdisciplinary projects by UMBC and UMB researcher partners, each a fresh take on a complex challenge. One will examine how to predict and manage stress in healthcare workers who work in long-term care facilities. Continue reading New UMBC-UMB collaborations include research to reduce stress among long-term care workers

UMBC student research offers hope for critically endangered Bahama Oriole

On a low-lying island in the Caribbean, the future of the critically endangered Bahama Oriole just got a shade brighter. A new study co-led by Michael Rowley estimates that there are at least 10 times as many Bahama Orioles as scientists previously thought. Rowley’s results are the latest in a string of important discoveries led by undergraduates mentored by Kevin Omland. Continue reading UMBC student research offers hope for critically endangered Bahama Oriole

UMBC launches Biotech Boot Camp to train workers displaced by COVID-19 for in-demand jobs

While some industries have lost jobs during the pandemic, the biotech industry has seen explosive growth. This new program seeks to address a mismatch between available workers and available jobs. Setting people up to succeed in well-paying new jobs and simultaneously filling the gap in the biotech workforce “is a win-win that we’re really excited to be a part of,” Annica Wayman says. Continue reading UMBC launches Biotech Boot Camp to train workers displaced by COVID-19 for in-demand jobs

Low-cost infant incubator developed at UMBC completes successful clinical trial in India

A standard incubator found in a newborn ICU costs between $1,500 and $35,000—beyond the means of many hospitals in low- and middle-income countries. This new UMBC-designed incubator costs only $200 and has performed on par with a standard incubator in its first clinical trial. Continue reading Low-cost infant incubator developed at UMBC completes successful clinical trial in India

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UMBC faculty, alumni entrepreneurs receive record number of MIPS awards for tech collaborations

Six UMBC faculty members have just received grants from the Maryland Industrial Partnerships (MIPS) program to develop new technologies with potential to grow the state’s economy. This is UMBC’s largest number of winning proposals within a single proposal round since MIPS began. Continue reading UMBC faculty, alumni entrepreneurs receive record number of MIPS awards for tech collaborations

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Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education honors UMBC’s innovative leadership in the field of aging

“Dr. Hrabowski has been at the forefront of creating and promoting a vision of how we think and talk about aging and longevity,” shares Dana Bradley, dean of UMBC’s Erickson School of Aging Studies. And the inclusive, forward-looking vision that he and the Erickson School emphasize has had notable impacts, including on the student experience. Continue reading Academy for Gerontology in Higher Education honors UMBC’s innovative leadership in the field of aging

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NIA grants UMBC’s Laura Girling $750K for research on living with dementia, including the impacts of COVID-19

“Persons with dementia are often portrayed as bedridden,” shares Laura Girling, director of UMBC’s Center for Aging Studies. “When I show clips of people living with dementia leading active lives, there is a realization that people with dementia can do many of the same activities others can.” Continue reading NIA grants UMBC’s Laura Girling $750K for research on living with dementia, including the impacts of COVID-19

UMBC researchers use AI to help businesses understand complex legal docs, like the Code of Federal Regulations

Businesses that work with the federal government must comply with the Code of Federal Regulations, a binding legal document. Its length and complexity cause challenges for many, so this automation process provides a way to improve understanding and accessibility, explains UMBC’s Karuna Joshi. Continue reading UMBC researchers use AI to help businesses understand complex legal docs, like the Code of Federal Regulations

Quantum computing, but even faster? UMBC researchers explore the possibilities with new NSF grant

Quantum computers have the potential to revolutionize communications, cybersecurity, and more. But as Sebastian Deffner notes, “Even quantum computing has shortcomings.” Deffner and Nathan Myers will explore ways to work around some of quantum computing’s limits with a new NSF grant. And in the process, they just might redefine the fundamental laws of physics. Continue reading Quantum computing, but even faster? UMBC researchers explore the possibilities with new NSF grant

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UMBC’s Danyelle Ireland is named a national Rising Star as champion for transfer students

This award honors Ireland’s years mentoring and advocating for UMBC transfer students in information technology and engineering fields. It also brings greater visibility to UMBC’s transfer student population and to how the university can most effectively support their success. Continue reading UMBC’s Danyelle Ireland is named a national Rising Star as champion for transfer students

UMBC students help create richer online courses for peers in engineering and computing fields

As UMBC faculty prepare for spring, they are reflecting on lessons learned from a primarily online fall 2020 semester. In UMBC’s College of Engineering and Information Technology (COEIT), this means honoring teaching fellows and teaching assistants for their role in making sure courses met student needs. Continue reading UMBC students help create richer online courses for peers in engineering and computing fields

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UMBC leaders and community support congressional resolution for national racial healing work

“Having university leadership sign on in support of this resolution is a big step,” says Eric Ford, director of The Choice Program at UMBC. “By taking this step, UMBC is sending a message to the campus community that inclusive excellence is not just a slogan but a virtue we live by.” Continue reading UMBC leaders and community support congressional resolution for national racial healing work