UMBC’s Sebastian Deffner explains how the “quantum speed limit” may put brakes on quantum computers

People have pinned their hopes on quantum computers for the next leap forward in computing technology, “but my recent research has revealed that quantum computers will have limits of their own,” writes Sebastian Deffner, “and has suggested ways to figure out what those limits are.” Continue reading UMBC’s Sebastian Deffner explains how the “quantum speed limit” may put brakes on quantum computers

UMBC celebrates alumni in public service at special Annapolis event

“Having UMBC alumni in the Senate, House of Delegates, the Governor’s Office, state agencies, advocacy groups and nonprofits is a great asset,” says House of Delegates Speaker Pro Tem Adrienne A. Jones ’76, psychology. “As public service professionals, we share the same camaraderie and ‘True Grit’ as we did as UMBC students.” Continue reading UMBC celebrates alumni in public service at special Annapolis event

UMBC physicists’ finding has potential to springboard quantum computing to major advances

The new finding “is attacking the bugaboo of this whole class of possible quantum computers,” says Jason Kestner. And yet, like so much in science, the finding “is something we stumbled across almost by accident,” says Michael Wolfe ’17. Continue reading UMBC physicists’ finding has potential to springboard quantum computing to major advances

UMBC alumna and visiting faculty member receives grant from Microsoft’s “AI for Earth” program

Jennifer Sleeman, Ph.D. ’17, computer science, visiting assistant professor of computer science and electrical engineering, received an award from Microsoft’s “AI for Earth” program to continue to develop algorithms to model and predict scientific disciplines such as climate change. Continue reading UMBC alumna and visiting faculty member receives grant from Microsoft’s “AI for Earth” program

UMBC a founding partner in coalition to increase transparency on life science career prospects

UMBC is among nine U.S. research universities and a major cancer institute that just announced plans to give would-be life scientists clear, standardized data on graduate school admissions, education and training opportunities, and career prospects. Continue reading UMBC a founding partner in coalition to increase transparency on life science career prospects

UMBC hosts faculty, alumni and corporate partners at the National Press Club to discuss cybersecurity and industry challenges

On Thursday, December 7, UMBC hosted experts from industry and academia at the National Press Club to discuss the cyber challenges professionals face, and how those groups can work together to prepare future generations of cybersecurity professionals. Continue reading UMBC hosts faculty, alumni and corporate partners at the National Press Club to discuss cybersecurity and industry challenges

UMBC students take flight to study weather, pollution in multi-institution initiative

Handling in-flight challenges on the spot showed the students “how the science gets done in real life,” Brian Carroll says. The flight experience met the initiative’s goal to provide experiential learning opportunities to expand students’ perspectives. Continue reading UMBC students take flight to study weather, pollution in multi-institution initiative

UMBC biologists discuss human health applications of studying plants’ circadian rhythms in The Conversation

Improper circadian clock function has already been linked to illnesses from diabetes to depression in humans. Plant science could grow our understanding. “As researchers continue to untangle more about how these clocks work—including how they influence interactions between hosts and their invading pathogens and pests—new forms of specially-timed precision medicine could be on the horizon,” write Lu and Wiratan. Continue reading UMBC biologists discuss human health applications of studying plants’ circadian rhythms in The Conversation

UMBC receives $1.3 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to diversify economics Ph.D.s

“It is really important to me to have people of color that I can look up to, come to, and connect with me on that level. It can be hard to understand what you are capable of doing if you don’t see a lot of people in this higher level of academia that look like you being successful,” says M’Balou Camara ‘15, political science, currently a student at Duke’s Sanford School of Public Policy Ph.D. program, with a concentration in economics. Continue reading UMBC receives $1.3 million grant from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation to diversify economics Ph.D.s

Undergraduate Research Symposium award winners embody success of UMBC STEM BUILD program

“The BUILD participants at URS exemplify the objectives of the program,” says Laura Ott. “By participating in the BUILD program, they’re helping us explore novel strategies to increase participation in undergraduate research for all students.” Continue reading Undergraduate Research Symposium award winners embody success of UMBC STEM BUILD program

For All the World To See

UMBC’s Maurice Berger launches new research projects with the CADVC

This fall, the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture celebrates launch of four significant research projects by Maurice Berger — new exhibition websites Revolution of the Eye: Modern Art and the Birth of American Television and For All the World To See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights, the creation of a new online home for Berger’s “Race Stories” essays, and the extension of a national tour of For All the World To See through the National Endowment for the Humanities’ On the Road program. Continue reading UMBC’s Maurice Berger launches new research projects with the CADVC

UMBC’s Michelle R. Scott receives the 2017 Letitia Woods Brown Article Prize

“The Griffin sisters article was an opportunity for me to reveal the often forgotten women who did civil rights work,” says Scott. What does it mean when you study WWII and you leave women off, or even the construction of a Civil Rights Act and add the word sex to it? The narrative changes and it must be told.” Continue reading UMBC’s Michelle R. Scott receives the 2017 Letitia Woods Brown Article Prize

Students in Patapsco Hall at UMBC.

New crowdfunding platform puts fundraising power in students’ hands

UMBC’s custom-built fundraising platform, Gritstarter, launched earlier this year to aid students in their philanthropic efforts. “This is a tool that connects the UMBC community with donors and helps everyone on campus understand how philanthropy works and how they can be involved on both sides,” said Leanna Powell ’08. Continue reading New crowdfunding platform puts fundraising power in students’ hands

Timothy Nohe exhibits at Washington College

Timothy Nohe, director of the Center for Innovation, Research and Creativity in the Arts (CIRCA) and professor of visual arts, is featured in a one-person exhibition at the Kohl Gallery on the campus of Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. The show, which opened Thursday, November 9th and continues through Friday, December 15, is entitled Voltage is Signal: Analog Video Works by Timothy Nohe and features works that explore analog video technology in innovative ways. Continue reading Timothy Nohe exhibits at Washington College

Dr. Adrienne Keene workshops with members from the UMBC community.

Annual Critical Social Justice events focus on themes of resilience and resistance

“It’s really important for CSJ to not just be these ivory tower conversations. We have to be thinking about the ways that we do social justice as an institution and as a community within Baltimore,” Jess Myers, director of The Women’s Center, explained. “What’s important to remember about Critical Social Justice is that it’s not just supposed to be five days. What we really hope is that it can create springboards or open doors for people to think about Critical Social Justice all the time.” Continue reading Annual Critical Social Justice events focus on themes of resilience and resistance

UMBC upgrades High Performance Computing Facility through new NSF grant, expanding possibilities for data-intensive research

UMBC received an NSF award to expand its High Performance Computing Facility (HPCF). The funding will go toward upgraded hardware and increased computing speeds for the interdisciplinary core facility, which supports scientific computing and other complex, data-intensive research. Continue reading UMBC upgrades High Performance Computing Facility through new NSF grant, expanding possibilities for data-intensive research

UMBC receives $6 million gift from the George and Betsy Sherman Family Foundation for two urban education initiatives

“If we don’t serve children and we can’t get education right then we get more of the same. I think things can change for individuals, and if we can change things for individuals then that is where the hope lies,” reflects Mavis Sanders, director for the new center. Continue reading UMBC receives $6 million gift from the George and Betsy Sherman Family Foundation for two urban education initiatives

20th Undergraduate Research Symposium shines a light on students’ diverse contributions to science

On October 14, more than 300 students from across the East Coast descended on campus to share their research with each other, participate in workshops, and learn about UMBC. The event celebrated the diversity among young scientists and the potential for their work to have a positive impact on the world. Continue reading 20th Undergraduate Research Symposium shines a light on students’ diverse contributions to science

George Derek Musgrove launches book at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

“Our hope is that people of goodwill will look at the lessons of D.C. history and use them to guide some of their activism,” says Musgrove.“We think it is a good guide for future action for making a better city, something really democratic of the alleged capital of the free world.” Continue reading George Derek Musgrove launches book at the National Museum of African American History and Culture

UMBC scientists measure plant productivity from space, with applications from farming to forest conservation

“We’re laying the groundwork for developing ways of monitoring vegetation,” says Fred Huemmrich. His and Petya Campbell’s new research uses images captured by instruments on the international space station to reveal global photosynthesis rates in unprecedented detail. Continue reading UMBC scientists measure plant productivity from space, with applications from farming to forest conservation

Charissa Cheah receives Fulbright award to research identity development of Muslim Tunisian immigrant adolescents in Sicily

“My colleagues and I who are cultural developmental scientists are trying to expand, diversify, and challenge people to think critically about culture and behavior,” says Cheah. “In the process, we aim to more accurately represent the world in which we live.” Continue reading Charissa Cheah receives Fulbright award to research identity development of Muslim Tunisian immigrant adolescents in Sicily

UMBC’s Erin Lavik receives National Eye Institute funding to create “living model of the human retina”

“We do not have good models for studying these diseases, but it is our hope that we can use this prize to build new models of the eye that can be screened rapidly to allow researchers to not only understand eye diseases but to look for new therapies,” said Lavik. Continue reading UMBC’s Erin Lavik receives National Eye Institute funding to create “living model of the human retina”

UMBC faculty awarded NSF grant to shrink tumors with heat and nanoparticles

“This strategy, if successful, will not only ensure delivering high payloads of anticancer drugs directly to tumors where they are needed the most, but also result in an overall reduction of drug dosage, and thereby reducing systemic toxicity in other body organs,” explains Liang Zhu, professor of mechanical engineering and PI of the grant. Continue reading UMBC faculty awarded NSF grant to shrink tumors with heat and nanoparticles

GRIT-X talks showcase experiences of outstanding faculty and alumni “from outer space to inner space”

Nine distinguished faculty and alumni shared their stories at GRIT-X, a TED talk-style event during UMBC’s Homecoming that took listeners “from outer space to inner space, from a makerspace to the classroom, from black holes in the universe to a pacemaker for the brain.” Continue reading GRIT-X talks showcase experiences of outstanding faculty and alumni “from outer space to inner space”