UMBC participates in national study on Ph.D. career pathways at pivotal moment for new grads

“The assumption that the Ph.D. is primarily a pathway to the professoriate is just not the case,” says Janet Rutledge, dean of the Graduate School. “We’re hoping that by being part of this study, we will determine the best ways to focus our time and our resources to most effectively guide our students.” Continue reading UMBC participates in national study on Ph.D. career pathways at pivotal moment for new grads

UMBC researchers win USDA grants to improve safety and efficiency of fish farming industry

Yonathan Zohar, professor and chair of marine biotechnology, explains that the two UMBC teams’ research “makes the point of how you can use advanced approaches and strategies of biotechnology to open some of the major bottlenecks in the aquaculture industry.” Continue reading UMBC researchers win USDA grants to improve safety and efficiency of fish farming industry

UMBC marine biologist Colleen Burge works to save world’s oysters from deadly herpes virus

“It may only be a matter of time until [deadly strains of the herpes virus] reach U.S. coastal bays,” Colleen Burge writes. That means finding a way to prevent massive oyster die-offs, which have already happened in other parts of the world, is important to save the species—and Burge is on the task. Continue reading UMBC marine biologist Colleen Burge works to save world’s oysters from deadly herpes virus

UMBC dedicates new Earth and Space Institute, building on decades of NASA collaboration

NASA has served as “a role model and inspirational force,” that has led people to reach for the stars for generations, shares Dean Bill LaCourse. “The Earth and Space Institute is our opportunity to reach for new heights,” he says. “To take that chance in the name of science, commitment, passion, and basic human curiosity.” Continue reading UMBC dedicates new Earth and Space Institute, building on decades of NASA collaboration

UMBC receives NSF grant to launch first-of-its-kind big data and high-performance computing training for researchers across disciplines

A new interdisciplinary course will teach researchers how to use high-performance computing techniques to analyze huge amounts of data. “In a way, we are training a new type of scientist, a new generation of scientists,” says Zhibo Zhang. Continue reading UMBC receives NSF grant to launch first-of-its-kind big data and high-performance computing training for researchers across disciplines

UMBC’s Gymama Slaughter to develop bioreactors that could pause the clock for life-saving organ transplants

Currently, organ and tissue donors typically need to be in close proximity to transplant recipients due to limitations in organ transport. With technological improvements, Slaughter says, the viability of the organs could be increased to about 36 hours, greatly expanding the distance an organ could travel from donor to recipient, and the likelihood of a successful transplant Continue reading UMBC’s Gymama Slaughter to develop bioreactors that could pause the clock for life-saving organ transplants

UMBC’s Tom Cronin explains how some animals “see without eyes”

“Many animals—including human beings—do have specialized light-detecting molecules in unexpected places,” Tom Cronin writes. While notable progress has been made in understanding these molecules in recent decades, there is still much to learn about their roles in processes from navigation to mood regulation. Continue reading UMBC’s Tom Cronin explains how some animals “see without eyes”

New study by UMBC’s Chris Swan finds restoration efforts more effective in small, isolated streams

“Our results amplify the call for a larger scale perspective on river restoration,” write Chris Swan and co-author Bryan Brown. That perspective, they suggest, should include considering ecological factors like species dispersal patterns when making restoration decisions. Continue reading New study by UMBC’s Chris Swan finds restoration efforts more effective in small, isolated streams

UMBC’s Erin Green receives nearly $1 million NIH grant for cutting-edge epigenetics research

“Any cell, in any species, is constantly bombarded with different signals from its environment,” says Erin Green. Her work could provide clues to understanding how those signals may trigger complex processes from aging to the spread of cancer. Continue reading UMBC’s Erin Green receives nearly $1 million NIH grant for cutting-edge epigenetics research

UMBC researchers address diverse factors impacting U.S. schooling

UMBC researchers from across the humanities and social sciences recently earned press coverage for their work exploring factors that shape K–12 education in the United States. From inclusive language in classrooms to math pedagogy, each offers insights to spur change and further research to improve children’s educational experiences. Continue reading UMBC researchers address diverse factors impacting U.S. schooling

Christy Ford Chapin recalls lost history of the U.S. health care system in New York Times op-ed

“Historians can use narrative to explain seemingly complex issues, add nuance to national conversations, and highlight overlooked facts,” says Christy Ford Chapin—all of which she does in her award-winning book about health care in the United States. Continue reading Christy Ford Chapin recalls lost history of the U.S. health care system in New York Times op-ed

UMBC’s Lipi Mukherjee receives NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship for atmospheric physics research

Mukherjee is creating a new model to more quickly and precisely detect particles dissolved in the ocean that can reduce survival of local marine life, cause algal blooms, and modulate global climate. She shares that at UMBC, “everyone is very helpful and open.” Continue reading UMBC’s Lipi Mukherjee receives NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship for atmospheric physics research

Breakthrough UMBC vision research finds protein holds promise to treat biological clock disorders

Two dramatic findings in mice suggest melanopsin, a retinal protein, may play a key role in regulating biological rhythms. If the findings hold in humans, further melanopsin research could eventually lead to treatments for disorders like non-24. Continue reading Breakthrough UMBC vision research finds protein holds promise to treat biological clock disorders

Danielle L. Beatty Moody receives competitive fellowship to enhance mentoring of diverse trainees

Beatty Moody, an assistant professor of psychology, will focus on techniques to support students in reaching their goals, based on their individual experiences, needs, and interests. “Mentoring is not a one-size-fits-all model,” she emphasizes. Continue reading Danielle L. Beatty Moody receives competitive fellowship to enhance mentoring of diverse trainees

UMBC forum highlights need for interdisciplinary collaboration in aging research

“Health, we know, is not cardiovascular, is not neurological, is not pathological. Those are completely artificial distinctions,” shared keynote speaker Luigi Ferrucci, director of science at the National Institute on Aging. “It’s become very, very clear that everything interconnects.” Continue reading UMBC forum highlights need for interdisciplinary collaboration in aging research

A Look Ahead highlights UMBC-affiliated scientists making waves in cell biology

A Look Ahead “is all about highlighting the pioneering research that our faculty, students, and staff here at UMBC do,” said Dean Bill LaCourse. “The aim of the College is to provide the tools and resources for the faculty and students to succeed and achieve great heights. We hope this event will be one of those tools.” Continue reading A Look Ahead highlights UMBC-affiliated scientists making waves in cell biology

New UMBC study highlights importance of multinational conservation efforts for migratory shorebirds

“We’ve seen bird populations plummeting in Australia,” says Colin Studds, “but the thing affecting their populations is actually happening thousands of miles away in China.” Studds’ new study explains that mudflats in the Yellow Sea are critical stopover sites during migration—but they’re disappearing. Continue reading New UMBC study highlights importance of multinational conservation efforts for migratory shorebirds

‘You’re outta here!’: UMBC physicists explain black hole ejected from center of galaxy

A black hole is traveling at 4.8 million miles per hour away from the center of its galaxy. Scientists believe it’s been kicked out by powerful gravitational waves. For the first time, Eileen Meyer says, “all the little pieces of evidence line up in favor of this scenario very specifically.” Continue reading ‘You’re outta here!’: UMBC physicists explain black hole ejected from center of galaxy