Justin Velez-Hagan

UMBC economic policy researcher examines the impact of Puerto Rico’s debt crisis

Justin Vélez-Hagan, a Ph.D. student in UMBC’s School of Public Policy and executive director of the National Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce, has been in the news recently after Puerto Rico defaulted on more bond payments, falling deeper into debt. Vélez-Hagan … Continue reading UMBC economic policy researcher examines the impact of Puerto Rico’s debt crisis

Tyson King-Meadows appointed associate dean of College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Tyson King-Meadows, chair of Africana studies and associate professor of political science, has been appointed associate dean of UMBC’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS), beginning in summer 2016. King-Meadows joined UMBC in 2003 and has held numerous … Continue reading Tyson King-Meadows appointed associate dean of College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

F. Chris Curran selected for prestigious Emerging Education Policy Scholar Program

F. Chris Curran, an assistant professor in UMBC’s School of Public Policy, has been named an Emerging Education Policy Scholar for 2015-16 by the Thomas B. Fordham Institute and the American Enterprise Institute. The Emerging Education Policy Scholars (EEPS) program is a … Continue reading F. Chris Curran selected for prestigious Emerging Education Policy Scholar Program

Michael Abrams

The Hilltop Institute Senior Research Analyst Michael Abrams presents 2015 Shinogle Fellowship Lecture

On Friday, December 4, Hilltop Senior Research Analyst and UMBC Public Policy PhD candidate Michael T. Abrams, MPH, gave the 2015 Judith A. Shinogle Memorial Fellowship lecture at UMBC. Abrams discussed the research projects—spearheaded by Shinogle before her tragic death … Continue reading The Hilltop Institute Senior Research Analyst Michael Abrams presents 2015 Shinogle Fellowship Lecture

Baltimore Skyline

F. Chris Curran writes Baltimore Sun op-ed about educational opportunity in Baltimore City

Following up on the recent release of several education assessments for the state of Maryland, F. Chris Curran, an assistant professor in the School of Public Policy, wrote a Baltimore Sun op-ed that examined the state of education in Baltimore City Public … Continue reading F. Chris Curran writes Baltimore Sun op-ed about educational opportunity in Baltimore City

APHA national meeting features UMBC leadership in social and policy dimensions of health research

UMBC took center stage as more than 13,000 public health professionals gathered in Chicago for the American Public Health Association (APHA) annual meeting, November 1-4, 2015. President Freeman Hrabowski presented the keynote address, which examined the conference theme “Health in … Continue reading APHA national meeting features UMBC leadership in social and policy dimensions of health research

Baltimore Inner Harbor.

John Rennie Short weighs costs and benefits of new “urban resurgence” in cities across the globe

On United Nations’ World Cities Day, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short published a column in The Conversation about what he calls the “Third Revolution,” or urban resurgence of cities around the world and its uneven impacts on social … Continue reading John Rennie Short weighs costs and benefits of new “urban resurgence” in cities across the globe

UMBC researchers collaborate to improve sustainability, with impacts in Maryland and across the nation

Local sustainability researchers and thought leaders took center stage on October 16, 2015, at a forum for urban sustainability in Baltimore, hosted by UMBC’s School of Public Policy. The forum was designed to examine how collaborations among government agencies, companies, … Continue reading UMBC researchers collaborate to improve sustainability, with impacts in Maryland and across the nation

Public Policy Sustainability Forum

School of Public Policy hosts forum on Urban Sustainability in Baltimore

Many local governments around the country are redesigning and rethinking policies and programs to become more sustainable. Baltimore has been a model for other cities by promoting collaboration among city government, local businesses, non-government organizations, and other groups to address … Continue reading School of Public Policy hosts forum on Urban Sustainability in Baltimore

John Rennie Short analyzes policy basis of increasing costs and damage of wildfires

In an article published September 23 in The Conversation, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short argued that a number of current federal policies, economic practices, and social issues are having a dramatic impact on the growing number of wildfires in the western part of the country. “More than eight million acres have burned in six of the years since 2000. There are two main reasons behind the growing conflagrations. The first is the legacy of fire suppression polices that snuff out fires as they appear, but leads to the build-up of fuel that is the raw material for larger, … Continue reading John Rennie Short analyzes policy basis of increasing costs and damage of wildfires

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Explains the Impact of Wealth on Immigration Policy in The Conversation

In a new column in The Conversation, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short revealed how immigrants can be treated differently based on wealth. Short wrote about how Canada’s Immigrant Investor Program and the UK’s Tier 1 investor visa are among many programs that provide economic incentives for wealthy immigrants. Short also focused on how such policies play out in the United States: “Since 1990, the US has an employment-based program tailored for the wealthy entitled EB5. Under this program, 10,000 visas each year are reserved for investors to receive permanent residence status if they invest at least US$1 million (only … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Explains the Impact of Wealth on Immigration Policy in The Conversation

F. Chris Curran, School of Public Policy, Writes About Teacher Overtime Policy in Education Week

F. Chris Curran, a new assistant professor in the School of Public Policy, recently wrote a letter to the editor about including teachers in overtime pay discussions that was published in Education Week. In the letter, Curran referenced President Obama’s announcement of plans for changes in overtime-pay regulations, noting that provisions of the proposal would prevent teachers from seeing benefits from the policy. “While teachers hoping for an extra paycheck may be disappointed, the national conversation on what President Obama calls a ‘fair day’s pay’ should not be allowed to pass the schoolhouse by. It is an opportunity to recognize, and … Continue reading F. Chris Curran, School of Public Policy, Writes About Teacher Overtime Policy in Education Week

Tim Brennan, School of Public Policy and Economics, Comments on Net Neutrality in the Brisbane Times

Tim Brennan, professor of public policy and economics, was quoted in a recent Brisbane Times article about the possibility of proposed net neutrality rules in Australia. Brennan, who served as chief economist of the FCC last year, was interviewed after presenting a talk about attempts to create net neutrality rules for U.S. carriers at the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s (ACCC) annual regulatory conference in Brisbane earlier this month. Brennan urged regulators to take a cautious approach to net neutrality in Australia: “Before Australia embarks on net neutrality, it should have evidence of a problem and not merely presumptions that there could be a … Continue reading Tim Brennan, School of Public Policy and Economics, Comments on Net Neutrality in the Brisbane Times

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Proposes Permanent Venue for the Summer Olympics

In a July 28 Washington Post op-ed, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short argued that a permanent island location should be established to host the Summer Olympic Games. He wrote that with the current hefty price tag and with thousands of residents being displaced by construction in host cities each time, holding the games in the same place every four years would save money and benefit residents. “Instead of investing billions of dollars for a new city every four years, we could create a permanent Olympics city, with facilities and athlete housing. Though any city could take this one, I’d … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Proposes Permanent Venue for the Summer Olympics

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Discusses Cities’ Impact on Climate Change in The Conversation

In the wake of the visit of 65 mayors to the Vatican to discuss climate change, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short wrote an article for The Conversation reflecting on the central role of cities in climate change discussions. “Cities house more than half the world’s population, consume 75% of its energy and emit 80% of all greenhouse gasses. But cities are not just sources of problems; they are innovative sites for policy solutions,” wrote Short, who is an expert on urban issues and environmental concerns. In his article, he wrote that many cities are on the front lines of climate change impacts, … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Discusses Cities’ Impact on Climate Change in The Conversation

Donald Norris, School of Public Policy, Shares eGovernment Research with Citizen 2015

Donald Norris, professor and director of the School of Public Policy, recently shared insight into the future of eGovernment with Citizen 2015, a new blog that explores how citizens interact and engage with government. In the interview, Norris discussed how the local eGovernment revolution has yet to reach its stated claims of more open, efficient, and effective governments. According to Norris, a chief reason is limited citizen demand: “Citizen participation, under the best of circumstances, is very difficult to achieve.” Norris was also recently in the news in the Washington Post and WJZ-TV commenting on Gov. Hogan’s political strategy in Baltimore and … Continue reading Donald Norris, School of Public Policy, Shares eGovernment Research with Citizen 2015

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Warns about the Dangers of Digital Distractions in The Conversation

In an article published July 7 in The Conversation, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short explained the value of unplugging during an age where technology is so prevalent in our daily lives. “The age of distraction is dangerous,” he wrote. “A recent report by the National Safety Council showed that walking while texting increases the risk of accidents. More than 11,000 people were injured last year while walking and talking on their phones…texting while driving resulted in 16,000 additional road fatalities from 2001 to 2007. More than 21% of vehicle accidents are now attributable to drivers talking on cellphones … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Warns about the Dangers of Digital Distractions in The Conversation

Justin Vélez-Hagan, School of Public Policy, Weighs in on Puerto Rico’s Fiscal Crisis

With Puerto Rico currently $72 billion in debt, School of Public Policy Ph.D. student Justin Vélez-Hagan has been in the news recently explaining the severity of the situation and its potential impact on the world economy. Vélez-Hagan, who is executive director of the National Puerto Rican Chamber of Commerce, shared his views on what has contributed to the debt crisis and what can be done to help get the economy back on track. “Not being able to have autonomous control over all of its policies puts Puerto Rico at a major disadvantage over other economies that it competes with for labor, business … Continue reading Justin Vélez-Hagan, School of Public Policy, Weighs in on Puerto Rico’s Fiscal Crisis

Donald Norris, School of Public Policy, Analyzes Martin O’Malley’s Presidential Campaign

In the days surrounding the official launch of Martin O’Malley’s presidential campaign last month, Donald Norris, director of the School of Public Policy, was interviewed by several local and national news outlets to provide context and analysis for O’Malley’s bid for the White House. In The Guardian, Norris discussed O’Malley’s chances for capturing the Democratic nomination. “He’s very smart. He’s very hard working. And he knows how to campaign,” said Norris. “And those three characteristics can overcome a lot of deficits.” He added: “I think he thinks that there is a shot. What that shot is, he’s got to understand, is … Continue reading Donald Norris, School of Public Policy, Analyzes Martin O’Malley’s Presidential Campaign

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Discusses Cities’ Impact on Climate Change in Citiscope

In a new article published in the journal Citiscope, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short argued that “cities are a focal point for action on climate change — and in time, climate action will seem as compelling to urbanites as the introduction of clean water systems in the late 1800s.” The article was a combination of a recent talk Short gave at the Conference on Communities and Urban Sustainability hosted by the French Embassy in Washington, D.C. and a subsequent Citiscope interview. In the article, Short highlighted the importance of cities in an interconnected world. “Cities are points in a network. The map shows the … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, Discusses Cities’ Impact on Climate Change in Citiscope

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, in The Conversation

“Now that the dust has settled and the media have moved onto the next crisis, we can ponder what the Baltimore riots tell us about broader and deeper issues in the US,” School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short wrote in an article published in The Conversation on May 15. In his column, using his “stress test” approach, Short examined the forces at play in Baltimore that contributed to the recent events: “Among them are decades of biased economic policies, class differences as well as racism, structural problems in metropolitan America, the consequences of aggressive policing and the geography of multiple … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, in The Conversation

Donald Norris (School of Public Policy) and Thomas Schaller (Political Science), Provide Analysis Ahead of Martin O’Malley’s May 30 Announcement

Former Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley is scheduled to announce his presidential plans on May 30 in Baltimore. School of Public Policy Director Donald Norris was interviewed by WJZ Channel 13 and commented on what the Democratic party landscape could look like for O’Malley should he officially declare his candidacy. “There is an increasing number of voices that are saying we need an alternative to Hillary Clinton,” he said. Thomas Schaller, professor and chair of political science, was quoted in a Governing article about how the recent events in Baltimore could impact O’Malley’s presidential plans. “The bad news is that the country is paying … Continue reading Donald Norris (School of Public Policy) and Thomas Schaller (Political Science), Provide Analysis Ahead of Martin O’Malley’s May 30 Announcement

John Rennie Short (School of Public Policy) and Luis Mauricio Pinet-Peralta (HAPP) Featured in UN Chronicle

The work of two researchers at UMBC was cited in the most recent issue of UN Chronicle, the magazine of the United Nations. A paper by John Rennie Short, professor, School of Public Policy, and Luis Mauricio Pinet-Peralta, associate director of the health administration and policy program, “No Accident: Traffic and Pedestrians in the Modern City,” Mobilities, vol. 5, pp. 41-59 was cited in the April 2015 issue of the Chronicle in a discussion of how cities are important for achieving sustainable development goals. Their paper examined the causes behind the increase in traffic accidents in cities in the global South and … Continue reading John Rennie Short (School of Public Policy) and Luis Mauricio Pinet-Peralta (HAPP) Featured in UN Chronicle

UMBC Faculty Provide Perspective and Reflect on Recent Events in Baltimore

In response to recent events that have transpired in Baltimore over the last several days, several UMBC faculty have engaged in thoughtful reflection and dialogue in the news around the complex challenges facing the Baltimore community. The substantive commentaries come from different viewpoints and add various perspectives to the ongoing conversation of the past week’s events. In The Conversation, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short wrote about three background factors that should be considered when asking why the violence and riots took place in response to the death of one young man: the momentum of the police brutality … Continue reading UMBC Faculty Provide Perspective and Reflect on Recent Events in Baltimore

John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, in The Coversation, Gives Keynote Address at French Embassy

With the percentage of the world’s population that lives in cities continuing to grow, School of Public Policy professor John Rennie Short published an article in The Conversation examining what cities can do to become more sustainable. In his article, Short looked at three ways to measure the environmental impact of cities: ecological, carbon, and water footprints. Short defined each measure and referenced various studies which compared data among cities. While they are an important starting point, he cautioned the three footprint measures should be analyzed in context. “These metrics are still in the early stages of development. There are lots of … Continue reading John Rennie Short, School of Public Policy, in The Coversation, Gives Keynote Address at French Embassy

Laura Hussey, Political Science, and Donald Norris, School of Public Policy, Discuss Anthony Brown’s Decision to Run for Congress

After former Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown announced he was running for the U.S. House seat vacated by Rep. Donna Edwards, reaction came in from across Maryland on Brown’s decision to jump back into politics after last year’s gubernatorial election. Laura Hussey, an associate professor of political science, was interviewed for an article in the Gazette about Brown’s decision, saying he is the likely front-runner in the race despite losing the gubernatorial election. “He’s got name recognition in a huge way,” Hussey said. “Plus he’s in his home territory and he’s going to have more support in that area.” To read the full … Continue reading Laura Hussey, Political Science, and Donald Norris, School of Public Policy, Discuss Anthony Brown’s Decision to Run for Congress

UMBC Political Science and School of Public Policy Faculty React to Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s Retirement Announcement

After Sen. Barbara Mikulski announced her retirement on March 2, reaction poured in from across the country and state of Maryland. UMBC political science and School of Public Policy faculty were interviewed by several local and national media outlets to provide perspective and analysis on Mikulski’s legacy and what the political future will hold after her seat is vacated in 2016. In an interview that aired on NPR’s “All Things Considered,” political science professor Roy Meyers said Sen. Mikulski’s legacy crossed party lines: “Many of the women that came into the Senate and the House, regardless of whether they were … Continue reading UMBC Political Science and School of Public Policy Faculty React to Sen. Barbara Mikulski’s Retirement Announcement

Dave Marcotte, School of Public Policy, in The Conversation

As many states across the country have dealt with significant snowfall over the last two months, school districts have been forced to shut down for several days. School of Public Policy professor Dave Marcotte has conducted extensive research on the impact of snow days on student learning, and published an article in The Conversation about the work he has done with his colleagues. “Research shows that fewer school days do reduce student performance, especially for the more disadvantaged students. Evidence from previous winters also shows that more days in school do, in fact, improve achievement for American students overall, something that has been … Continue reading Dave Marcotte, School of Public Policy, in The Conversation

John Rennie Short, Public Policy, in The Conversation

In light of the recent significant snowfall across parts of the Northeast, School of Public Policy professor John Rennie Short wrote an article for The Conversation in which he analyzed the impact of climate change on extreme weather events. In referencing the 60 inches of snow that fell in 30 days on Boston and parts of the wider region, Short wrote: “This is the new normal for weather in the US. Global climate change increases the chances that the once-a-century event is now a once-every-twenty-years occurrence. The country is now experiencing more severe weather events: long droughts in the Southwest, destructive wildfires … Continue reading John Rennie Short, Public Policy, in The Conversation

Donald Norris, Public Policy, in the Baltimore Sun and Washington Post

In the days surrounding Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s State of the State address, Donald Norris provided analysis on what to expect for the remainder of the legislative session. Norris, professor and director of UMBC’s School of Public Policy, discussed GOP fundraising, the relationship between the governor and legislature, and ongoing discussions over the budget. Norris was interviewed for several articles in the Baltimore Sun and Washington Post. To read complete coverage, click below: A GOP governor means new challenges for longtime Md. Senate President Mike Miller (Washington Post) As budget battle heats up in Annapolis, Democrats rally around school funding (Washington Post) … Continue reading Donald Norris, Public Policy, in the Baltimore Sun and Washington Post

Donald Norris, Public Policy, Provides Analysis as Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan Takes Office

In the days surrounding Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan’s inauguration, Donald Norris provided insight and analysis as to how the Maryland legislature may work with the new governor. Norris, professor and director of UMBC’s School of Public Policy, also reflected on outgoing Gov. Martin O’Malley’s legacy. In an NBCWashington.com article, Norris analyzed the relationship between Maryland’s new governor and legislature: “So if Hogan chooses to fight with the Democrats, it’s going to be an ugly four years,” Norris said. “He won’t get anything accomplished. If he can find ground for compromise and cooperation, then I think things will work out pretty well for … Continue reading Donald Norris, Public Policy, Provides Analysis as Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan Takes Office

Donald Norris, Public Policy, on WYPR’s Midday with Dan Rodricks, in Bethesda Magazine

On December 23, Donald Norris, professor and director of the School of Public Policy, joined WYPR’s Midday with Dan Rodricks for a review of the year’s most significant political stories. Norris, along with Melissa Deckman, chair of the political science department at Washington College, analyzed the results of Maryland’s gubernatorial election, discussed the future of outgoing Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, and other significant national political stories heading into the new year. The full segment can be accessed here. On January 7, Norris was quoted in an article published in Bethesda Magazine examining the future of the Purple Line under incoming governor Larry Hogan. … Continue reading Donald Norris, Public Policy, on WYPR’s Midday with Dan Rodricks, in Bethesda Magazine

Donald Norris, Public Policy, in National Journal and the Baltimore Sun

In a recent National Journal article on a potential bid for the White House by Maryland Governor Martin O’Malley, Public Policy Professor and Chair Donald Norris was interviewed for the story and discussed how O’Malley’s relationship with the Clintons could affect the 2016 campaign. “The Clintons and he are close,” said Norris. “He endorsed her the first time. I don’t know he could run against her without burning a lot of bridges he just doesn’t want to burn.” Norris was also interviewed for a Baltimore Sun article about the future of the Republican Party in Maryland. “They’ve gone through this ‘pull to the right and … Continue reading Donald Norris, Public Policy, in National Journal and the Baltimore Sun

John Rennie Short, Public Policy, in New York Observer

On December 10, New York Observer published an article on the “Second Gilded Age” in New York City, in which it describes recent increases in spending among the wealthiest New Yorkers. Research by Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short is extensively quoted in the article. The full excerpt is below: “In the collection of essays, Geographies of the Super-Rich, published last year, John Rennie Short, a professor of public policy at the University Maryland Baltimore County, refers to this period as the ‘Second Gilded Age.’ Mr. Short estimates that 103,000 people worldwide have a net worth in excess of $30 million, and … Continue reading John Rennie Short, Public Policy, in New York Observer