UMBC’s Deborah Rudacille awarded Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue writing project on addiction

“I think the more knowledge that is generated and the more we understand things, sometimes things that we find very scary or frightening, the better we are able to make good policy decisions and personal decisions on the basis of science,” Deborah Rudacille explains. Continue reading UMBC’s Deborah Rudacille awarded Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue writing project on addiction

Anthony Jankoski to pursue interest in criminal justice at Northwestern University’s School of Law

“My professors and faculty mentors have helped me to become a critical thinker and an active voice on campus. These skills have proved invaluable during my tenure as president of student government and will assist me greatly in law school,” says Jankoski. Continue reading Anthony Jankoski to pursue interest in criminal justice at Northwestern University’s School of Law

UMBC heads to Light City Baltimore: festival of light, music, innovation

Baltimore’s history as the first U.S. city to be illuminated by gas lamps has inspired Light City Baltimore, a new festival in the Inner Harbor, March 28-April 3, with 1.5 miles of glowing public artworks, free music, a free UMBC hospitality space, and a six-day innovation conference, Light City U. Continue reading UMBC heads to Light City Baltimore: festival of light, music, innovation

Mathematics of Being Human

The Mathematics of Being Human receives positive review in advance of production in New Delhi

Since it debuted at UMBC in November 2014, The Mathematics of Being Human has garnered strong praise and it has traveled to San Antonio, New York City, and Baltimore. Its latest review comes in advance of an independent production of the play … Continue reading The Mathematics of Being Human receives positive review in advance of production in New Delhi

Jessica Berman presents research at prominent international symposium in Sweden

At a recent symposium held at Uppsala University, Sweden featuring prominent international modernist research, Jessica Berman, director of the Dresher Center for the Humanities and professor of English, presented an invited lecture about her research on transnational movements of people in the … Continue reading Jessica Berman presents research at prominent international symposium in Sweden

Fall 2015 Big Prize Poetry Slam (10/9)

Fall 2015 Big Prize Poetry Slam Friday, October 9, 2015 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM Performing Arts & Humanities Building : Atrium Slam BIG and win BIG at the fourth annual Poetry Slam hosted by the English Department this year on October 9 from 6:00 to 8:00 PM in the Performing Arts & Humanities Building Atrium. You will not want to miss this momentous event. A first prize of two hundred dollars will go to the winner of this dazzling, high-energy slam. There are second and third place prizes too for students and alumni sharing their original work, scored by … Continue reading Fall 2015 Big Prize Poetry Slam (10/9)

Steph Ceraso, English, Receives the 2015 Richard Ohmann Outstanding Article in College English Award

Steph Ceraso, an assistant professor of English, has been selected for the 2015 Richard Ohmann Outstanding Article in College English Award. The annual award is presented by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Ceraso received the recognition for her article “(Re)Educating the Senses: Multimodal Listening, Bodily Learning, and the Composition of Sonic Experiences.” The award is recognition of an outstanding refereed article in the past volume year of the journal College English that makes a significant contribution to the field of English studies. It is given in the name of Richard Ohmann, landmark editor of College English from 1966 to … Continue reading Steph Ceraso, English, Receives the 2015 Richard Ohmann Outstanding Article in College English Award

Orianne Smith, English, Wins Inaugural British Association of Romantic Studies First Book Prize

Orianne Smith, associate professor and chair of English, has won the prestigious biennial First Book Prize from the British Association of Romantic Studies (BARS). Smith’s book Romantic Women Writers, Revolution, and Prophecy: Rebellious Daughters, 1786–1826 (Cambridge University Press, 2013) was selected from a strong shortlist of finalists for the inaugural prize. Professor Smith traveled to Cardiff, Wales to accept the award. In an announcement posted on the BARS blog, the judges stated during the award ceremony that her book “corrects the gender imbalance of previous work on literary enthusiasm by shedding light on the previously obscured role of women writers in apocalyptic discourse…a … Continue reading Orianne Smith, English, Wins Inaugural British Association of Romantic Studies First Book Prize

Michele Osherow, English, and Manil Suri, Mathematics, Explore “The Mathematics of Being Human” on WYPR

On Thursday, July 16, Michele Osherow, associate professor of English, and Manil Suri, professor of mathematics, were guests on WYPR’s Humanities Connection to discuss their play “The Mathematics of Being Human,” which debuted at UMBC last fall. The play explores how mathematics and the humanities offer valuable perspectives on what it means to be human, perspectives that at first glance are highly distinct, but that create entry points for conversation and shared understanding over time. “The idea of pairing mathematics with humanities subjects like literature may seem odd. But, we found that there are many exciting opportunities for joint exploration. The humanities can … Continue reading Michele Osherow, English, and Manil Suri, Mathematics, Explore “The Mathematics of Being Human” on WYPR

Lia Purpura and Deborah Rudacille, English, Reflect on Freddie Gray’s Death in the Baltimore Sun and American Short Fiction

English Writer in Residence Lia Purpura and English Professor of the Practice Deborah Rudacille recently published their thoughts and reflections on the death of Freddie Gray in American Short Fiction. Their powerful commentaries focused on the problematic use of cliches in how the Baltimore riots were described and the tactics of police in certain neighborhoods in the city. In “Baltimore, April 2015: Some Thoughts on Thugs and Clichés,” Purpura wrote about some of the words that were surrounding descriptions of the riots (thugs, criminals, etc.) and the need to listen and reflect to fully understand the complexity of the situation: “What can … Continue reading Lia Purpura and Deborah Rudacille, English, Reflect on Freddie Gray’s Death in the Baltimore Sun and American Short Fiction

“The Mathematics of Being Human” Reviewed in Siam News

Ahead of a scheduled performance of “The Mathematics of Being Human” on July 29 at the BRIDGES Conference in Baltimore, the play received a positive review in Siam News. It debuted at UMBC on November 4, 2014, and has since been performed across the country in San Antonio, New York City, and Washington, D.C. Featuring Michele Osherow, associate professor of English, Manil Suri, mathematics professor, Savannah Jo Chamberlain ’16, theatre, Chaz Atkinson ’16, theatre, and directed by Alan Kreizenbeck, associate professor of theatre, the play chronicles the struggles of two professors trying to develop a joint seminar studying the intersection of math and literature. “I … Continue reading “The Mathematics of Being Human” Reviewed in Siam News

UMBC Faculty Provide Perspective and Reflect on Recent Events in Baltimore

In response to recent events that have transpired in Baltimore over the last several days, several UMBC faculty have engaged in thoughtful reflection and dialogue in the news around the complex challenges facing the Baltimore community. The substantive commentaries come from different viewpoints and add various perspectives to the ongoing conversation of the past week’s events. In The Conversation, School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short wrote about three background factors that should be considered when asking why the violence and riots took place in response to the death of one young man: the momentum of the police brutality … Continue reading UMBC Faculty Provide Perspective and Reflect on Recent Events in Baltimore

Jean Fernandez, English, Presents at BMA and Everyman Theater

On April 11, Jean Fernandez, English, delivered a talk on Reading Chairs as a panelist for the Baltimore Museum of Art’s exhibition event “Ten Chairs.” The panel consists of a cross-disciplinary group of thinkers who addressed one of the chairs in the collection as seen though the eyes of their discipline. Other featured speakers came from Johns Hopkins University, Columbia University, University of Pennsylvania, and the Smithsonian Institution. On the same day, Fernandez also participated as a panel member in a discussion of Henrik Ibsen’s “Ghosts,” as part of Everyman Theater’s World of the Play Series. The discussion was hosted … Continue reading Jean Fernandez, English, Presents at BMA and Everyman Theater

Christopher Corbett, English, in Vox

More than 150 years after the first mail was delivered via the Pony Express, Vox published an article examining the service that lasted for only 18 months. Christopher Corbett, professor of the practice in the English department, was quoted in the article. He is author of Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express. “In the American memory, that man is still riding across the country,” said Corbett when reflecting on the Pony Express. He also discussed how the mail service’s business model played a major role in its undoing. The business was always doomed. “It hemorrhaged money … Continue reading Christopher Corbett, English, in Vox

Lia Purpura, English, to Present Reading at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts (4/10)

English Writer in Residence Lia Purpura is scheduled to present readings from her new book It Shouldn’t Have Been Beautiful at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts on Friday, April 10 at 8 p.m. The reading will be part of an event with the Poulenc Trio, a Baltimore-based wind trio that has been presenting virtuosic performances for over a decade. Purpura, whose work frequently appears in New Yorker magazine, will pair excerpts from her forthcoming book with a new arrangement for the Trio of Alfred Schnittke’s Suite in the Old Style. For more information on the event, click here. Update: On … Continue reading Lia Purpura, English, to Present Reading at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts (4/10)

Marion Elizabeth Rodgers (3/31)

For more than a quarter of a century, Marion Elizabeth Rodgers has been considered the foremost authority on the American critic and journalist H.L. Mencken as well as the editor of his works. Mencken was born and lived his entire life in Baltimore where he was long associated with the Baltimore Sun papers along with editing two of the nation’s most distinguished literary magazines – The American Mercury and The Smart Set.  He was also the author of The American Language. Ms. Rodgers is the author of a critically acclaimed biography – “Mencken: The American Iconoclast” – published by Oxford … Continue reading Marion Elizabeth Rodgers (3/31)

Manil Suri, Mathematics, and Michele Osherow, English, Reflect on Experience Performing “The Mathematics of Being Human”

In an article in the March 6 edition of India Abroad magazine, Mathematics professor Manil Suri discussed the play he performed and co-wrote with English associate professor Michele Osherow, “The Mathematics of Being Human.” The play is an outgrowth of a seminar that the two professors jointly taught that bridged their areas of expertise. In the article, Suri participated in a Q&A about the play and his experience teaching with Osherow. To read the full article, click here. Suri and Osherow, both alumni of Carnegie Mellon University, were also interviewed for a recent news article on the university’s website about the play. In the … Continue reading Manil Suri, Mathematics, and Michele Osherow, English, Reflect on Experience Performing “The Mathematics of Being Human”

Christopher Corbett, English, in Baltimore Style

Christopher Corbett, English, recently penned an essay reflecting on the harsh winter months in Baltimore Style. In the piece, Corbett decries January as the most unloved month, calling it the season of remorse. He writes, “January is really about winter, the bleak midwinter spoken of in the poem and hymn… I do not believe anyone enjoys January. We endure it.” Click here to read “In the Bleak Midwinter.” Continue reading Christopher Corbett, English, in Baltimore Style