Georgina Stephanie presents at URCAD 2017.

UMBC students tackle complex questions with creativity at URCAD 2017

Now in its twenty-first year, UMBC’s Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement Day (URCAD) “attains a certain kind of maturity,” but it’s “thrilling to see that as it comes of age, it retains the brawling, restless energy that has always made it so special,” shares Simon Stacey, interim dean and vice provost of undergraduate education. Continue reading UMBC students tackle complex questions with creativity at URCAD 2017

UMBC’s Deborah Rudacille awarded Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue writing project on addiction

“I think the more knowledge that is generated and the more we understand things, sometimes things that we find very scary or frightening, the better we are able to make good policy decisions and personal decisions on the basis of science,” Deborah Rudacille explains. Continue reading UMBC’s Deborah Rudacille awarded Guggenheim Fellowship to pursue writing project on addiction

Roy Meyers publishes primer on the federal budget process, outlining anticipated hurdles for Trump administration proposal

“The bottom line is that the White House publicized a target of $54 billion…in cuts without receiving any feedback from agencies about the feasibility of making them,” writes Meyers, professor of political science. Continue reading Roy Meyers publishes primer on the federal budget process, outlining anticipated hurdles for Trump administration proposal

New app Valuable Voices builds awareness of linguistic and cultural diversity in the classroom

“Teachers and students thrive when they all have a deeper understanding of linguistic and cultural diversity,” says Christine Mallinson, who developed the app with collaborator Anne Charity Hudley (William & Mary) and Aureanna Hakenson ’15. Continue reading New app Valuable Voices builds awareness of linguistic and cultural diversity in the classroom

Kimberly Moffitt joins WEAA to comment on the role of the news media in covering President Trump

Moffitt participated in a roundtable discussion on how the media covered Rep. John Lewis’s decision to not attend the inauguration. She also appeared on The Baltimore Sun’s “Roughly Speaking” podcast to analyze President Trump’s inaugural address. Continue reading Kimberly Moffitt joins WEAA to comment on the role of the news media in covering President Trump

Erle Ellis asserts value of social sciences in defining onset of human impact on Earth

Anthropocene science is an emerging, interdisciplinary field, which requires a variety of voices be at the table, Ellis argues. Answering the question of when and how humans began transforming Earth might guide us, he suggests, toward “more desirable outcomes both for human societies and for non-human nature.” Continue reading Erle Ellis asserts value of social sciences in defining onset of human impact on Earth

New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

“Science achievement gaps begin early. It is important that our policies and interventions take steps in those early years to ensure increased science achievement for all,” writes F. Chris Curran, an assistant professor of public policy. Continue reading New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

In new book, Brian Grodsky argues recent revolutions are threatening the future of democracy

“I’m writing this book now because we are at this precarious period where I think we can still save democratic legitimacy and we can still move forward with democratization,” says Grodsky. “But in order to do this we need to stop and we need to think about what people are after.” Continue reading In new book, Brian Grodsky argues recent revolutions are threatening the future of democracy

Ian Anson

Ian Anson examines how biased perceptions of the economy could influence the presidential election

In a new article published in The Conversation, Anson focuses on two recent research papers in which he investigates how economic biases are formed and maintained and explores what the future of economic accountability might look like. Continue reading Ian Anson examines how biased perceptions of the economy could influence the presidential election

During Rio games, John Rennie Short argues underestimated costs pose major challenges for Olympic host cities

In the article, “On rocky road to Rio, the biggest loser may be the glory of hosting Olympics,” Short comments on the increasing scale of the games, growing global coverage, and underlying structural problems. Continue reading During Rio games, John Rennie Short argues underestimated costs pose major challenges for Olympic host cities

Zero tolerance laws contribute to racial disparities in U.S. public schools, research by F. Chris Curran reveals

“Clearly, such zero tolerance laws were meant to improve the safety and order of the school environment,” writes F. Chris Curran in a new article in The Conversation. “However, in recent years, they have been seen as being overly prescriptive and as contributing to racial disparities in school discipline.” Continue reading Zero tolerance laws contribute to racial disparities in U.S. public schools, research by F. Chris Curran reveals

John Rennie Short

John Rennie Short explains what Brexit vote reveals about economic and social inequality in the U.K.

“The Brexit vote reveals and embodies the deep divide in the U.K. between the different regions of England and Wales and especially between the affluent London and the South East. This division is unlikely to heal soon,” writes UMBC’s John Rennie Short. Continue reading John Rennie Short explains what Brexit vote reveals about economic and social inequality in the U.K.

UMBC’s 2016 Fulbright Scholars to serve as teachers and researchers around the world, from Moldova to Malaysia

“What I loved about this year’s class is that they threw themselves into the process early,” says Brian Souders. “They really got into the spirit of Fulbright, which is all about cultural exchange.” Continue reading UMBC’s 2016 Fulbright Scholars to serve as teachers and researchers around the world, from Moldova to Malaysia