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UMBC’s Huemmrich uses NASA satellite to measure effects of climate change on evergreen forests

Will longer growing seasons help slow climate change, or will increased drought speed it up? New research demonstrates a remote-sensing technique has the potential to help us figure that out, and follow-up studies are already putting it to work. Continue reading UMBC’s Huemmrich uses NASA satellite to measure effects of climate change on evergreen forests

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UMBC support for STEM grad students from underrepresented groups featured as a national model

UMBC’s Summer Success Institute creates opportunities for mentorship and community building among graduate students, supplementing academic programs to “[make] sure students have the emotional and community support they need to thrive,” says Renetta Tull. Continue reading UMBC support for STEM grad students from underrepresented groups featured as a national model

Exhibition Clip; Revolution of the Eye
Modern Art and the Birth of American Television
The Jewish Museum
May 1 – September 20, 2015; Organized by the Jewish Museum, New York, and the Center for Art, Design,
and Visual Culture, University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).
Exhibition Curator: Maurice Berger

“Revolution of the Eye” opens at UMBC’s Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Hailed as “groundbreaking” by The Baltimore Sun’s David Zurawik, this exhibition is the first to explore how avant-garde art influenced the look and content of network television in its formative years. It is on display at UMBC through December 10. Continue reading “Revolution of the Eye” opens at UMBC’s Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture

Critical Social Justice 2016

Critical Social Justice celebrates UMBC as a home for learning, activism, and social change

In her keynote talk “Body/ Land/ Home: Disability Justice, Healing Justice and Femme of Color Brilliance,” Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha explained how lived experiences can provide a foundation for social justice. Continue reading Critical Social Justice celebrates UMBC as a home for learning, activism, and social change

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Michael Eric Dyson headlines Obama Effect 2.0 conference at UMBC

“This conference is not only significant to our understanding of the potential legacy of the first self-identified African-American president of the United States, but it is also timely as we approach one of the most contentious and polarizing presidential elections of our country’s history,” says Kimberly Moffitt, associate professor of American studies and lead conference organizer. Continue reading Michael Eric Dyson headlines Obama Effect 2.0 conference at UMBC

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Alumni Awards highlight profound impact, drive, and commitment of UMBC alumni and faculty

“People you see on this stage are not just amazingly talented, they are good people who have done great work,” shared President Hrabowski. “I can’t think of anything an educator would want more than that: People who care about others, who strive for excellence, and who never, never, never give up.” Continue reading Alumni Awards highlight profound impact, drive, and commitment of UMBC alumni and faculty

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GRIT-X showcases groundbreaking UMBC research, scholarship, and creative achievement

The inaugural GRIT-X featured some of the university community’s most fascinating new research and creative work in three sets of 10-minute talks that covered topics from the process for creating a successful theatre company to dealing with contaminants in local watersheds. Continue reading GRIT-X showcases groundbreaking UMBC research, scholarship, and creative achievement

Chris Curran

New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

“Science achievement gaps begin early. It is important that our policies and interventions take steps in those early years to ensure increased science achievement for all,” writes F. Chris Curran, an assistant professor of public policy. Continue reading New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

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In new book, Brian Grodsky argues recent revolutions are threatening the future of democracy

“I’m writing this book now because we are at this precarious period where I think we can still save democratic legitimacy and we can still move forward with democratization,” says Grodsky. “But in order to do this we need to stop and we need to think about what people are after.” Continue reading In new book, Brian Grodsky argues recent revolutions are threatening the future of democracy

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Ellen Handler Spitz publishes letter in The New York Times on why handwriting is still important

“As a humanities professor at a large public university with a diverse student population, I ask my students to write longhand in class each week. At first, some protest, but I persist, for I have found that intimacy, immediacy and personal quality infuse their handwritten essays,” Spitz writes. Continue reading Ellen Handler Spitz publishes letter in The New York Times on why handwriting is still important

Ian Anson

Ian Anson examines how biased perceptions of the economy could influence the presidential election

In a new article published in The Conversation, Anson focuses on two recent research papers in which he investigates how economic biases are formed and maintained and explores what the future of economic accountability might look like. Continue reading Ian Anson examines how biased perceptions of the economy could influence the presidential election