Legends of Excellence Awards celebrate UMBC faculty and staff who inspire black and Latino students

The work these legends did to support minority students “made a positive difference, and our students not only survived, but thrived,” shared Cynthia Hill, and President Hrabowski pointed out that UMBC now serves as a national model for elevating people from all backgrounds. Continue reading Legends of Excellence Awards celebrate UMBC faculty and staff who inspire black and Latino students

UMBC's Postdoctoral Fellows for Faculty Diversity

Marketplace radio series highlights UMBC faculty diversity initiatives

What will it take to move the dial on the representation of diverse faculty at U.S. colleges and universities? Marketplace, a leading radio program on business and the economy, tackles this question in two new stories highlighting UMBC’s work to train, recruit, hire and retain diverse faculty. Continue reading Marketplace radio series highlights UMBC faculty diversity initiatives

Tyson King-Meadows appointed associate dean of College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

Tyson King-Meadows, chair of Africana studies and associate professor of political science, has been appointed associate dean of UMBC’s College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences (CAHSS), beginning in summer 2016. King-Meadows joined UMBC in 2003 and has held numerous … Continue reading Tyson King-Meadows appointed associate dean of College of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences

W.E.B. Du Bois Lecture: Linked fates and great expectations

W.E.B. Du Bois Lecture  Dinaw Mengestu, MacArthur Fellow, acclaimed novelist, and professor of English, Brooklyn College Wednesday, November 11 | 7 pm Performing Arts and Humanities Building, Earl and Darielle Linehan Concert Hall An Ethiopian-American novelist who has garnered widespread critical acclaim for his intimate depictions of the immigrant experience in America, Dinaw Mengestu was named a “20 under 40” writer by The New Yorker and received the National Book Award Foundation’s “5 under 35” Award for his debut novel, The Beautiful Things That Heaven Bears. This novel tells the story of Sepha Stephanos, who fled the Ethiopian Revolution and immigrated … Continue reading W.E.B. Du Bois Lecture: Linked fates and great expectations

Humanities Forum: Dear White People: Film Screening and Conversation (9/24)

Humanities Forum Kimberly Moffitt, Dresher Center fellow and associate professor of American studies, UMBC Damon Turner, adjunct professor in Africana studies, UMBC and PhD Candidate in African American history, Morgan State University Thursday, September 24 | 7 pm Performing Arts & Humanities Building : Rm. 132 The film Dear White People follows the lives of four black students at an Ivy League college. Director and writer Justin Simien says, “My film is about identity. It’s about the difference between how the mass culture responds to a person because of their race and who that person understands themselves to truly be. … Continue reading Humanities Forum: Dear White People: Film Screening and Conversation (9/24)

Humanities Forum: Panel Discussion on “Slavery by Another Name” (2/9)

On Monday, February 9, Dr. Spencer Crew presents the Humanities Forum “Panel Discussion on ‘Slavery by Another Name.” The event will take place at 4:30 p.m. in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. The film Slavery By Another Name explores a reality that often went unacknowledged: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted from the 1800s until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery By Another Name tells the story of black men who were forced to work as convict laborers in factories, mines, and farms. These men … Continue reading Humanities Forum: Panel Discussion on “Slavery by Another Name” (2/9)

Film Screening: Slavery by Another Name (2/2, 2/4)

As part of the Humanities Forum series, on Monday, February 2 and Wednesday, February 4, there will be screenings of the film Slavery by Another Name. They will take place at noon each day in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. Slavery by Another Name explores a reality that often went unacknowledged: a huge system of forced, unpaid labor, mostly affecting Southern black men, that lasted from the 1800s until World War II. Based on the Pulitzer-Prize-winning book by Douglas Blackmon, the film Slavery by Another Name tells the story of black men who were forced to work as convict laborers in … Continue reading Film Screening: Slavery by Another Name (2/2, 2/4)

UMBC Political Science and Public Policy Faculty Provide National, State, and Local Election Analysis

Several UMBC faculty have been in the news providing 2014 midterm election analysis. Thomas Schaller, Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department, appeared on MSNBC’s “All in with Chris Hayes,” to analyze the election results and discuss how Republican control in Congress could affect legislation in the future. In addition, Schaller co-wrote a column for Politico Magazine before the election in which he discussed pre-election polls of Latino voters and how they could have an affect in predicting the outcome in Colorado’s Senate race. Schaller was quoted in a Washington Post story before the election discussing how the Maryland gubernatorial race turned unexpectedly close … Continue reading UMBC Political Science and Public Policy Faculty Provide National, State, and Local Election Analysis

Tyson King-Meadows, Africana Studies and Political Science, Co-Authors Report on Black Voter Turnout and the 2014 Midterm Elections

On Wednesday, October 29, the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies released a report on black voter turnout and the 2014 midterm elections. The report was co-authored by Tyson King-Meadows, Chair of the Africana Studies Department and Associate Professor of Political Science, and Andra Gillespie, Associate Professor of Political Science and Interim Chair of the Department of African American Studies at Emory University. The report determined that black voters are a critical component of the electorate in 17 competitive gubernatorial and Senate races across the country. It also found that black voter participation declines in midterm elections, and “assuming a black … Continue reading Tyson King-Meadows, Africana Studies and Political Science, Co-Authors Report on Black Voter Turnout and the 2014 Midterm Elections

Tyson King-Meadows, Political Science and Africana Studies, on Facing South

In “Why the 2014 Election Matters for Voting Rights,” the online magazine Facing South delves into analysis by UMBC’s Tyson King-Meadows on last week’s CBC Annual Legislative Conference panel “Protecting the Right to Vote.” King-Meadows is associate professor of political science and chair of Africana studies. The panel discussed voting rights issues in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent invalidation of Section Five of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (VRA). In his remarks, King-Meadows described two ways the VRA’s influence could shrink further, including underfunding for the attorneys who address claims relating to voter rights and appointing … Continue reading Tyson King-Meadows, Political Science and Africana Studies, on Facing South

Tyson King-Meadows, Political Science and Africana Studies, Speaks on Voting Rights Panel

Tyson King-Meadows, associate professor of political science and chair of Africana studies, will speak this afternoon on the panel “Protecting the Right to Vote” at the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) Annual Legislative Conference. Panelists will discuss voting rights issues in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent invalidation of key parts of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Panel organizers share: Through its opinion in Shelby County v. Holder, the Supreme Court substantially altered the web of laws protecting the voting rights of the African-American Community.  While the federal government still retains formidable authority under the Voting Rights Act, … Continue reading Tyson King-Meadows, Political Science and Africana Studies, Speaks on Voting Rights Panel

Daphne Harrison, former chair of Africana studies, and Michelle Scott, history, on the Marc Steiner Show

Dr. Daphne Harrison, former Chair of the Africana Studies, and Dr. Michelle Scott, Associate Professor of History, joined the Marc Steiner Show on Tuesday, June 19, for a segment called Juneteenth: Holiday Commemorating the Abolition of Slavery in Texas. The oldest known celebration of the abolition of slavery in the United States, Juneteenth commemorates African American freedom and emphasizes education and achievement. Dr. Harrison and Dr. Scott also discussed the history of classic female blues artists of the 1920s and 1930s with gospel singer Lea Gilmore. Dr. Harrison is author of “Black Pearls: Blues Queens of the 1920s.” Listen to … Continue reading Daphne Harrison, former chair of Africana studies, and Michelle Scott, history, on the Marc Steiner Show

Humanities Forum Panel Discussion Featured on “Marc Steiner Show”

A Humanities Forum panel discussion recorded at UMBC during the Spring semester was featured on the “Marc Steiner Show” on Tuesday, June 5. The topic was “Race and the Civil Rights Movement in Music and Media,” and the discussion featured Derek Musgrove, assistant professor of history; Michelle Scott, associate professor of history; Marc Steiner, host of the “Marc Steiner Show” and Daphne Harrison, emerita professor in Africana Studies and founder of the Dresher Center for the Humanities. The discussion was moderated by Kimberly Moffitt, assistant professor of American Studies. The full discussion can be heard here. For more information about … Continue reading Humanities Forum Panel Discussion Featured on “Marc Steiner Show”

Tyson King-Meadows, Political Science, Elected to WYPR Board of Directors

UMBC’s Tyson King-Meadows, associate professor of political science and incoming chair of Africana studies, has been elected to the WYPR Board of Directors for a three-year term (July 1, 2013–June 30, 2016). For the past year, King-Meadows has participated in the prestigious American Political Science Association (APSA) Congressional Fellowship Program, with his experience on Capitol Hill complementing his teaching and research on the U.S. Congress. King-Meadows is the author of When the Letter Betrays the Spirit: Voting Rights Enforcement and African American Participation from Lyndon Johnson to Barack Obama (Lexington Books, 2011). He is currently writing a book on post-Reconstruction … Continue reading Tyson King-Meadows, Political Science, Elected to WYPR Board of Directors

Gloria Chuku, Africana Studies, Awarded Fellowship

Gloria Chuku, associate professor of Africana studies, has been awarded the Summer 2012 West African Research Association (WARA) post-doctoral fellowship. WARA’s mission is to promote research and scholarly exchange between West African and US scholars and institutions, and the award will enable Chuku to conduct research in Nigeria on the Biafra-Nigeria War during the summer. Continue reading Gloria Chuku, Africana Studies, Awarded Fellowship