GRIT-X showcases groundbreaking UMBC research, scholarship, and creative achievement

The inaugural GRIT-X featured some of the university community’s most fascinating new research and creative work in three sets of 10-minute talks that covered topics from the process for creating a successful theatre company to dealing with contaminants in local watersheds. Continue reading GRIT-X showcases groundbreaking UMBC research, scholarship, and creative achievement

Founders Day celebrates 50 years of inclusive excellence at UMBC

“This has been a 50-year experiment in Catonsville,” Pres. Hrabowski explained. “Can you bring people together from all races, backgrounds, and religions, and have them learning how to work together, to live together, and to listen to each other? That’s what we’re in the process of doing in our country, and it’s what we believe we are doing on this campus and will do even more of in the time to come.” Continue reading Founders Day celebrates 50 years of inclusive excellence at UMBC

New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

“Science achievement gaps begin early. It is important that our policies and interventions take steps in those early years to ensure increased science achievement for all,” writes F. Chris Curran, an assistant professor of public policy. Continue reading New research by Curran and Kellogg points to inequities in science education from early age

In new book, Brian Grodsky argues recent revolutions are threatening the future of democracy

“I’m writing this book now because we are at this precarious period where I think we can still save democratic legitimacy and we can still move forward with democratization,” says Grodsky. “But in order to do this we need to stop and we need to think about what people are after.” Continue reading In new book, Brian Grodsky argues recent revolutions are threatening the future of democracy

Ellen Handler Spitz publishes letter in The New York Times on why handwriting is still important

“As a humanities professor at a large public university with a diverse student population, I ask my students to write longhand in class each week. At first, some protest, but I persist, for I have found that intimacy, immediacy and personal quality infuse their handwritten essays,” Spitz writes. Continue reading Ellen Handler Spitz publishes letter in The New York Times on why handwriting is still important

Ian Anson

Ian Anson examines how biased perceptions of the economy could influence the presidential election

In a new article published in The Conversation, Anson focuses on two recent research papers in which he investigates how economic biases are formed and maintained and explores what the future of economic accountability might look like. Continue reading Ian Anson examines how biased perceptions of the economy could influence the presidential election

Tahira Mahdi, Ph.D. student, describes how the arts and humanities impact lives in radio interview

“When we think about evaluating the impact of the arts and humanities, we should start by thinking about what life will be like without these everyday studies of ourselves,” explains psychology Ph.D. student Tahira Mahdi in a segment on WYPR. Continue reading Tahira Mahdi, Ph.D. student, describes how the arts and humanities impact lives in radio interview

During Rio games, John Rennie Short argues underestimated costs pose major challenges for Olympic host cities

In the article, “On rocky road to Rio, the biggest loser may be the glory of hosting Olympics,” Short comments on the increasing scale of the games, growing global coverage, and underlying structural problems. Continue reading During Rio games, John Rennie Short argues underestimated costs pose major challenges for Olympic host cities

Zero tolerance laws contribute to racial disparities in U.S. public schools, research by F. Chris Curran reveals

“Clearly, such zero tolerance laws were meant to improve the safety and order of the school environment,” writes F. Chris Curran in a new article in The Conversation. “However, in recent years, they have been seen as being overly prescriptive and as contributing to racial disparities in school discipline.” Continue reading Zero tolerance laws contribute to racial disparities in U.S. public schools, research by F. Chris Curran reveals

John Rennie Short

John Rennie Short argues that the South China Sea dispute could have significant global consequences

An international court ruling could escalate geopolitical tensions around the world. That’s according to School of Public Policy Professor John Rennie Short, who explains in a new op-ed how an ongoing dispute in the South China Sea could have significant global consequences. Continue reading John Rennie Short argues that the South China Sea dispute could have significant global consequences

Ellen Handler Spitz examines the relationship between psychoanalysis and the arts in new publications

In a special online issue of the American Psychological Association journal, “Psychoanalytic Psychology” devoted to the humanities, Spitz has the lead article, linking the humanities with psychoanalysis by building on an expanded lecture presented initially at the Austen Riggs Center’s Erikson Institute. Continue reading Ellen Handler Spitz examines the relationship between psychoanalysis and the arts in new publications

John Rennie Short

John Rennie Short explains what Brexit vote reveals about economic and social inequality in the U.K.

“The Brexit vote reveals and embodies the deep divide in the U.K. between the different regions of England and Wales and especially between the affluent London and the South East. This division is unlikely to heal soon,” writes UMBC’s John Rennie Short. Continue reading John Rennie Short explains what Brexit vote reveals about economic and social inequality in the U.K.

UMBC’s 2016 Fulbright Scholars to serve as teachers and researchers around the world, from Moldova to Malaysia

“What I loved about this year’s class is that they threw themselves into the process early,” says Brian Souders. “They really got into the spirit of Fulbright, which is all about cultural exchange.” Continue reading UMBC’s 2016 Fulbright Scholars to serve as teachers and researchers around the world, from Moldova to Malaysia

Nancy Rankie Shelton publishes thought-provoking memoir about love, loss, and survival

Shelton, a professor of education, is author of a powerful new book that is already receiving significant praise for its contributions to the growing body of literature on living and dying well. The book, titled “5-13: A Memoir of Love, Loss and Survival,” was published earlier this month by Garn Press. Continue reading Nancy Rankie Shelton publishes thought-provoking memoir about love, loss, and survival

Kimberly Moffitt weighs in on the presidential election and Gov. Hogan’s stance on Trump

Moffitt joined analyst Richard Cross on The Baltimore Sun’s “Roughly Speaking” podcast with Dan Rodricks to discuss the state of the 2016 presidential campaign and Gov. Larry Hogan’s announcement that he will not endorse Donald Trump. Continue reading Kimberly Moffitt weighs in on the presidential election and Gov. Hogan’s stance on Trump

Pres. Hrabowski focuses on building supportive learning communities at NYT Higher Ed Leaders Forum

“What we’ve worked to do at UMBC…is to look in the mirror,” Dr. Hrabowski explained. “We have a theory of change that we’ve been working on now for almost 20 years that focuses on how you create communities of empowerment for students…but also how we rethink the teaching and learning process.” Continue reading Pres. Hrabowski focuses on building supportive learning communities at NYT Higher Ed Leaders Forum

Fan Yang’s “Faked in China” tackles competing visions of the Chinese economy in a globalized world

“There is a need to think about what China really means not just for China, but for the world. Looking at the interactions between culture and economy in China is a way for us to broaden the scope of cultural studies in the West,” says Yang, an assistant professor of media and communication studies. Continue reading Fan Yang’s “Faked in China” tackles competing visions of the Chinese economy in a globalized world

Derek Musgrove

George Derek Musgrove reflects on the surprisingly brief history of D.C.’s presidential primary

June 14 marked the 60th anniversary of Washington D.C.’s first presidential primary. George Derek Musgrove, associate professor of history, joined WAMU Radio to discuss why it took so long for the nation’s capital to have a say in presidential politics. Continue reading George Derek Musgrove reflects on the surprisingly brief history of D.C.’s presidential primary

Community Law in Action honors LaMar Davis, director of The Choice Program, as a 2016 Baltimore Inspiring Voice

“This award speaks to our program and institution’s inspired commitment,” Davis shared. The Choice Program at UMBC is a nationally recognized model for community-based intervention that has served more than 25,000 youth and their families from Maryland’s highest risk communities. Continue reading Community Law in Action honors LaMar Davis, director of The Choice Program, as a 2016 Baltimore Inspiring Voice